Tag Archive: author guest post


Guest Post: D. S. Smith

Alright, I’ve mentioned this blog tour before, but today’s the day my post goes live. This one’s about the inspiration behind Unparalleled. Enjoy!

Unparalleled coverThe inspiration for writing Unparalleled came to me during a visit to the zoo. I had been toying with the idea of writing a science fiction novel after reading other works in this genre. I was especially impressed by Michael Crichton’s novel, Timeline. In this story, a group of scientists are sent back in time to medieval France.

 

I loved the way Crichton crafted this story, using a combination science and technology with history and malevolence to create a gripping tale of conflict and wonder. As I strolled around the zoo, head buzzing with ideas for a tale of my own, I came across the tiger enclosure. A group of people gathered at the fence watching a keeper throw meat to one of the animals. The tiger did not seem interested in the scraps being thrown, but it did seem very interested in the source of food.

 

I marveled at the fact that the keeper and the tiger were only separated by a chain fence and a moat circling the enclosure. I imagined the carnage that would take place if the fence were to suddenly disappear, or what would happen if someone was dragged from the past, like a character from Timeline, materializing at the other side of the fence, face to face with one of these magnificent yet lethal beasts. The idea for a story started to take form and that night I wrote the prologue for Unparalleled.

 

Unfortunately, life got in the way of writing and the first few hand written pages of what was to become my first published novel were shoved into a shoebox and stored in the loft.

 

Ten years past before the creative juices started to flow again and the story progressed beyond the prologue. I had just finished reading ‘The Time Travelers Wife’ by Audrey Niffenegger. I enjoyed the way she used science fiction to create a love story with a modern day twist of Shakespearian conflict. I decided to use a similar method, not so much to create a love story but to try to place every day characters with real emotions into extraordinary situations. Situations that make them question everything they have ever understood about their existence and the world they live in.

 

Unparalleled is as much about the human condition as it is about the science fiction. It turned out to be a very different story to the one I thought of all those years ago. The whole novel stems from the original prologue which gained its own momentum as one idea lead to another. I hope the pace of the novel keeps the reader interested while the underlying plot, based on real science, leaves them wondering, what if…….

DSSmith Author pic

You can find Unparalleled here or here.

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Hey all, sorry for going radio silent again. Odd week. It’s Friday the 13th and I figured what better time to treat you all to an excerpt from a book that, as I hear it, does some really cool stuff with werewolves. The author, Dan O’Brien is re-releasing his entire bibliography, so if you’re interested this could be an awesome time to check him out. Either way, enjoy!

cover

Synopsis: A predator stalks a cold northern Minnesotan town. There is talk of wolves walking on two legs and attacking people in the deep woods. Lauren Westlake, resourceful and determined FBI agent, has found a connection between the strange murders in the north and a case file almost a hundred years old. Traveling to the cold north, she begins an investigation that spirals deep into the darkness of mythology and nightmares. Filled with creatures of the night and an ancient romance, the revelation of who hunts beneath the moon is more grisly than anyone could imagine.

An excerpt from Bitten:

THE CREATURE crashed into the sides of its space. Tearing broken, rusted objects from the shelves, it threw them to the ground in angry fits of rage. Tears streamed down its face and the guttural whimper that echoed in the oversized shed was the only shred of humanity that remained.

With each mashed piece of its life, it plunged deeper into madness; closer to the monster it was slowly becoming. The light of the day had all but faded. Reaching out and grasping a light bulb that hung dimly at the center of the shed, it crushed it, allowing the shards to rip apart its hands.

Blood dripped on the work table and the partial husk of Wayne Joyce’s mutilated face. It had stretched out the flesh, drying it and coating it with deer oil. Its cries were crocodile tears; there was no emotion left except rage, hatred. Remorse and guilt long since disappearing into the abyss that was its mind.

The winds howled.

It responded.

Black thread, spooled with a sharp needle, sat beside the human mask. It reached down with one of its mangled hands, lifting the needle and then the flesh. Pressing against its skin, it drove the needle into its own face, drawing blood and an angry snarl. Each time through, there was a growl and a pool of blood. The task was complete: the flesh attached to the monster.

Little folds lifted from its face. The wind whipped against them, drawing its attention. Reaching out to a staple gun, it pressed it against its face. The creature drove thick steel staples into its face, flattening out the macabre mask.

The table was a massacre.

Leftover pieces of the trophies it took were lifeless artifacts of its ascension to death-bringer. Reaching out for the long claw of torture it wore as a glove, the creature groaned. Language was lost. More and more, it felt like an animal, a creature meant to destroy everything.

The rage built like steam. It coursed through its veins, polluting every aspect of humanity that remained. The moon would rise soon––full and omniscient. That would be the moment of its ascension.

It would be its masterpiece.

 

If you love supernatural fiction, a good mystery, and a fun story, then you’ll want to give Bitten a look. Releasing in July as well is the follow-up novella, Drained. The third novella in the series, Frighten, will be released in early 2019.

What readers are saying about Bitten

“Bitten is an extremely well-balanced and engaging novel. It contains mystery, suspense, horror, romance, and best of all – a creative, genre-bending twist on werewolf mythology. The story is quick-paced and dark without being too heavy or overdramatic. The protagonist is a strong and courageous FBI agent who is able to assert herself without casting aside her femininity. She reminds me of Sue Grafton’s Kinsey Millhone and Janet Evanovich’s Stephanie Plum…. If a sequel follows, I will definitely read it.”

“Author Dan O’Brien left his mark with Bitten. I’ve now read three books by O’Brien, but BITTEN is by far my favorite. It not only showcases his literary skills, but leaves the reader wanting more. What else could an avid reader ask for?”

Get it today on Kindle!

Dan OBrein author picture

Dan O’Brien has over 50 publications to his name––including the bestselling Bitten, which was featured on Conversations Book Club’s Top 100 novels of 2012. Before starting Amalgam Consulting, he was the senior editor and marketing director for an international magazine. You can learn more about his literary and publishing consulting business by visiting his website at: www.amalgamconsulting.com. Follow him on Twitter at @AuthorDanOBrien.

Mad Cat Franz and the Bomb cover

For me there has always been something a little weird about books. That someone you’ve never met, who may even be long dead, had an idea for a character, a place, a scene, a story form in their mind and translated it into lines of squiggles on pieces of paper. Years later you come along and pick up those pieces of paper and decipher the squiggles and in your mind the images re-form. You may say, well duh-huh stupid, that’s writing and reading! This I know, but there still seems a little magic involved.

Personally, an idea for a novel can quite literally trigger from anything at all. Something seen, heard, read, an event, a feeling experienced, a comment, a joke, an injustice particularly, a silly fact, a conversation overheard. There’s no end to the list really. Also this trigger can provide the missing links to let you chain together any number of ideas you’ve been carrying around for some time into a workable synopsis.

The idea-spark for my latest novel Mad Cat, Franz and the Bomb came from a quip, too vulgar to repeat here, made by a good friend of mine when he deranged a line from the musical Oklahoma. For some bizarre reason it combined with an image I’d had in my head for years that goes like this.

It’s a beautiful summer day and you’re sat at the beach gazing at a calm sea when you notice something moving in the water close in front of you. As you watch, the surface of the water is broken by the top of a blond head, a forehead appears, eyes, a face, shoulders until the figure of a German World War Two pilot in uniform steadily walks up out of the water bone dry. The beach is crowded but no one else sees him. Only you.

In the novel the ‘you’ concerned is a teenage girl, Catherine McEvoy, also known to one and all in the small seaside town as Mad Cat because as a young child she insisted she had three invisible friends who tormented her horribly. Franz is the German pilot and the Bomb in question, which maybe real or not, is used as a metaphor for what is happening to Cat.

The other main characters are two retired gay actors, Teddy and Perry, who are as good as family to Cat. Perry is calm and loving while Teddy is profane and raucous and also, in the story, dying. That these characters are polar opposites allows for the injection of humour at regular intervals to prevent the story becoming too sad or introverted. This wasn’t a conscious, contrived device on my part as the two characters occurred naturally alongside the initial idea, but I did find I enjoyed them as I wrote their scenes and so their interjections became more frequent as the story unfolded.

The world building for the novel was relatively easy given the geographical setting of the story. We’re all familiar with such small, seaside towns and the one I describe is an amalgam of a few I am familiar with. The houses and rooms are imagined to reflect the characters who live in them and are assembled with as much of an eye for detail as possible to try to bring them alive. It wasn’t as if I had to envisage a dystopian future world and I admire writers who are capable of that type of imagination.

I read somewhere Stephen King will sometimes begin writing a novel or short story with no idea how it will end and just let it continue not knowing where it will take him. Just writes. Amazing. Being a mere mortal and old school in comparison, as soon as I get the initial story idea I pretty much know most of the beginning and always the ending and much of the arc leading from one to the other, though as the story develops it can go off at tangents I hadn’t originally thought of at all.

This being in many ways three stories woven and linked together around the central character Cat, made keeping the events and scenes in the arc fluent a little complicated, rather like juggling at times. Also there was quite a bit of historical research involved which can be laborious but it does sometimes uncover unthought-of pearls that enrich the story. I shouldn’t say this but it also looks like you know what you’re talking about!

And as for characters, well, they can cause a real problem. I’m lucky in that they mostly come fully formed right down to the sound of their voice and their clothes  and once they are realised they are fixed as firmly as something ghastly you’ve seen and can’t un-see. Some very occasionally require a little polishing to make them, hopefully, memorable for the reader.

The problem being invariably when writing, other characters will appear which are great but ultimately not right for the particular story and so you have to, as Faulkner says, “…kill all your darlings.” That can be a tough call sometimes to know if it is the right decision or not and the upshot is you end up with a disgruntled mob in the back of your mind grumpily waiting to be employed in their own yarn. Likewise a scene you’ve written can be really on the money but it jars in the context of the overall story. You read and re-read looking for any excuse to include it but eventually and however reluctantly, you admit it just has to go.

Mad Cat, Franz and the Bomb is in essence a ghost story and the three invisible friends who torment Cat as a child I saw as perhaps, the horrid spirits of Victorian children who once inhabited the house where she lives. The concept of invisible friends is interesting to me too in that, in young children they are tolerated but in adults it’s labelled as delusionary or schizophrenia, which is something I explore in the story too. So are they real or is Cat indeed going mad as everyone believes?

Author Picture

Bio of Tony McAndrew:

Having what little education thrashed into him by nuns at the convent caned out of him by grammar school, Tony kept a promise to himself to begin writing when he finished doing tedious stuff like working full time. After a wander through psychiatric nursing, the Met Police and almost thirty years as a frontline paramedic the time seemed about right. He still works now and again in Primary Care somewhere in Wales and lives happily on the Gower indulging in writing, reading, talking with friends, drinking beer and floating in the sea with his wife.

Guest Post: Brendon Bertram

Hey all, I’ve got an awesome guest  post for you today from Brendon Bertram, the author of Moira Ashe: Enemy Within. He’s talking about secrets and what makes him want to write. Enjoy!

Moira Ashe cover

All of my secrets.

There were a lot of things that possessed me to write; the world, the characters, their relationships and stories, the perfect scenes in my head begging to be written. But it was the secrets that excited me the most.

Of course writing a scene that has been rattling around in my head gives me an immense sense of satisfaction, it’s thinking about all the clues, the foreshadowing, the patterns I’ve set up in the book series that compel me to dance for joy, and that is no joke, I literally do!

I was inspired to start my writing career when I delved into the world of the fan theory, people were generating the craziest theories about their favorite movies and books. Some were convincing, other probable, but most were outlandish beyond belief. It was all go fun though, but I had a thought, what if the theory was true? What if there were clues hidden throughout a story for people to find, a secret that could shake everything they thought they knew? So I wrote Moira Ashe.

My first series, Moira Ashe, has its ending already planned, it was planned before the first word was written. It’s been an ordeal coming up with over seven books of the story in advance, but it has been worth it. I have references scattered throughout about things the reader dosen’t even know exist yet. There are even clues that spoil the ending of the seventh book in book one.

As much as I’m enjoying the secrecy, I’m looking forwards to when the secret’s discovery. They were written to be found after all. I want my secrets will blow people’s minds, to have them realize that the answers were there all along and they never realized it. I want them to question everything they thought they knew about a character. That is why I write.

It continues to be great fun weaving these mysteries into my stories, and I hope you have just as much fun uncovering them.

Thank you to Lauren’s Bookshelf for hosting me and thank you for giving me your time today. Check out brendonbertram.com to find out more information on the Moira Ashe series.

If you want to try uncovering my secrets or just want a great read Moira Ashe: Enemy Within is available on Amazon.com.

 

Brendon Charles Bertram was born on May 28, 1994. Working on the family farm on PEI, it wasn’t until March 27, 2015, after the death of his father that he began pursuing writing. He continues to live on PEI, but now occupies his time with travelling the globe, reading texts on philosophy and psychology, and exploring a deep fascination and passion for storytelling.

Hey all, I’m taking part in Authoright’s Spring Reading Week this year. I’m lucky enough to get to both host the guest post here and to do a review of the first novel in this series, Devil’s Demise. That’ll be up later today. For now though here’s the author, Lee Cockburn. Enjoy!

Character development between books.

At the beginning I carefully chose the two main characters to feature in the novel Devil‘s Demise, they are Taylor Nicks and Marcus Black, I chose names that I like, ones I thought were pretty cool, names I would like for myself if I could choose, male or female.

I then thought about what they would be like, as people, their good points and their bad, Taylor striking to look at, intelligent, committed to work, but very flighty in her private life, unintentionally hurting others as she fails to commit to them, the explanation for this will come in the third book which will hopefully be out this year.  Marcus is a very handsome, kind, caring individual, clean cut, faithful, hard working, and loyal, everything a man could be, committed to his wife and son, and works very hard to provide for them, he’s intelligent and enjoys his work, and the team he works within.

These two main characters are featured heavily through all three novels, the books cover their working relationships and their private lives, the emotional turmoil of the harrowing incidents they deal with week in and week out.  The second book Porcelain Flesh of Innocents covers one of the most terrifying situations a parent will ever face, DC Marcus Black’s son is snatched from just outside their home, only being left for a moment.  The rollercoaster of fear and terror, their heartaches as the team work to try and get him back before it is too late.  Both novels delve deeply into their personal lives, as other characters dip in and out of the storyline and add to the ups and downs the main characters are involved in.

I like the freedom of writing you can and add and takeaway characters as and when required, new love interests for Taylor, their emotional problems, their personalities, their draw towards the main characters, especially Taylor, she tends to lure people into her life and then shuts the door as they get too close, when she deeply wants to change, to be different, but hasn’t managed, yet.

Taylor and Marcus are good friends as well as colleagues and share a relationship that many would crave to have, they are able to tell the truth to one an other, whether it will be liked or not, they have each others backs and are fiercely loyal to one another, and share a mutual respect, but don’t always see eye to eye, as their private lives differ greatly in the spectrum of life.

The main storyline will always change, along with the villain, so to speak, other characters will come and go, and others will feature throughout all three books, their part to play always simmering just below the surface, their presence almost as important as the main characters, with the depth of the parts they play, so the reader will also wonder about what will happen to them too.

I don’t know if I’ve really explained how all the characters roles develop, it just happens, when you are writing the story moves in varying directions and the characters just fold into the mix and their importance in the grand scheme of things, is just like a piece in a jigsaw, it can’t be completed without every little bit, some a piece of sky, the same as many others and non descript and the others a face, or special feature, but all required to complete the task.

Hopefully if and when the reader finishes the novels, they will be satisfied the way the story has kept the characters parts running, explaining what is going on in their lives and leaving them wanting the characters to do the right thing and wanting things to work out for them, and of course, wanting more.

 

Devils Demise cover

Devil’s Demise

A cruel and sinister killer is targeting Edinburgh’s most powerful women, his twisted sense of superiority driving him to satisfy his depraved sexual appetite. He revels in the pain and suffering he inflicts on his unsuspecting victims but a twist of fate and an overwhelming will to survive by one victim ruins his plans for a reign of terror. His tormented prey will need all her courage if she is to survive the hunt.

Purchase from Amazon UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Devils-Demise-Lee-Cockburn-ebook/dp/B00OKQB900/ref=sr_1_2?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1509620984&sr=1-2&keywords=lee+cockburn

Lee Cockburn Photo

About Lee Cockburn

Lee Cockburn has worked for Police Scotland for sixteen years including as a police sergeant in Edinburgh for seven years and also as a public order officer. Before joining the force, she played for Scotland Women’s rugby team for fifteen years, earning over eighty caps for the Scottish ladies and British Lionesses teams. She also swam competitively for twelve years, successfully representing Edinburgh at the age of fifteen in the youth Olympics in Denmark in 1984. Lee lives in Edinburgh with her civil partner Emily and their two young sons Jamie and Harry. Her first book Devil’s Demise was published by Clink Street Publishing November 2014.

Follow Lee Cockburn on Twitter: https://twitter.com/lee_leecockburn

Guest Post Kate Forest

Alright everybody, I’ve got a guest post for you today from Kate forest, the author of Interior Design and Other Emotions and Grounded. With NaNoWriMo going on, what she’s talking about is near and dear to my heart.

Writer’s Block? No, Writer’s Despair.

Generally, when I am finishing up a first draft I panic. Without a clear idea of what to write next, I decide that it’s time to throw in the towel, give up my writing life. I call my critique partner, Veronica Forand, and moan, “I have no more ideas. I don’t think I’ll write again. This is my last book.” Her response is usually to mumble something encouraging or tell me to shut up because I said that last time. (She really is supportive in some ways. There’s a reason I keep her around.)

But no, I insist. This is really it. I’m blank. Nothing is coming to mind. Oh, wait. I’ve got an idea. How about a story in which a woman touches a magical stone and goes back in time to Scotland? No, that’s been done. Ooh, here’s one. How about a modern retelling of Pride and Prejudice, only it will be in diary form. Ok, never mind.

But then this happens. On a rare day, I will get a decent night’s sleep. Not a measly 7 hours interrupted by a trip to the bathroom and the sound of the dog vomiting outside the bedroom door. I mean a gooood night’s sleep. One the ends when the alarm chimes, I stretch, gaze out the window at the sun just peeking above the trees, and smile. No cricks in my middle aged body and plenty of time to get everyone ready for school. And then BLAMO!

A pair of characters appears in my head. They are completely formed and I know exactly why they can never be together, but why they must fall in love and find some way of overcoming their personal and relational obstacles.

Sure, I have no idea what their plot is. Where and when will they live? What will the world and villains throw at them to keep them from their goals? Who the heck knows? That’s a problem to hash out with my critique partners. In that moment, I need to write pages and pages of notes as the ideas pour out.

Of course, by that time, there isn’t plenty of time to get everyone ready for school and the morning seems less serene. But my heart is filled with confidence and hope.  And with those tools, I can do anything. Even write another book.

Just a quick change to the contest as a result of this, apparently I misunderstood while setting up the giveaway but there will be two winners instead of one.  Both winners will receive one of the two Jackie Rutledge novels rather than one receiving both.  I’m sorry about the mix up guys.  This will be reflected on the giveaway post as well.   But on to the fun stuff!  As the title suggests, we’ve got a guest post to day from the author himself!  Enjoy!

Hello, everyone. I’ve been granted the opportunity to post today in regard to the release of the second book in my Deadworld series, The Vengeful Dead. It’s what I would call paranormal crime fiction or if you’re in a bookstore, urban fantasy. One of the problems in writing urban fantasy, or any genre for that matter, is developing something that feels fresh and new, even when it often isn’t. There is certainly a vast wealth of material to draw upon regarding the supernatural, from vampires to werewolves to demons and fairies. We UF authors borrow a lot from the lore and stories of old to build our own.

I am certainly no exception to this. Deadworld has its share of ghosts and vampires, though I’ve taken a bit of a different spin on what a vampire is.  They aren’t your traditional, gothic, undead variety, because I wanted to do something different with them that would give readers a different feel. On that end, I believe I’ve succeeded to some degree. When I originally wrote Deadworld, I  had a completed story left with some dangling threads that could be picked up if a publisher decided they wanted to pursue that. Fortunately for me, they did, and I was left trying to figure out exactly where to go from there. When I sold, I had moved on to another story and had left Deadworld to sit. Now I had to develop another two books to go with the first. So, where was it going to go?

I knew there would be cases to solve, a developing relationship between Jackie and Nick, and Jackie’s continued efforts to resolve her emotional issues (she has a few of them).  Having a love for epic stories though, I wanted to incorporate a bigger, series spanning arc. I wanted it to involve the supernatural, and I had three major elements to work with: vampires, ghosts, and the “other” side or Deadworld where the ghosts reside and the vampires are inextricably connected to.  Vampires and ghosts have been used quite a bit, and even with a “fresh” spin, I didn’t feel all that excited about expanded upon them. The Deadworld though, it held possibilities. What could I do with this place, a spirit world that in some ways was a mirror of our own? If it was a place where the souls of the dead resided until they were ready to move on, what could I do with it? The first question that came to mind was, “If souls move on from here, where exactly is it they move on too?” This led me to think that if Deadworld was something of a world between, and we humans moved there when we died, what was to say that something else, from somewhere else, couldn’t access it as well?

The image of that something else came to me rather quickly, and you will see it in The Vengeful Dead, albeit in more of an introductory fashion. I don’t want to spoil anything, so I won’t give out any more details on that, but it is the beginning of a story arc that will encompass the rest of the series, or at least the next few books, assuming I’m fortunate enough for it to get that far. This element begins to develop in book three, The Lingering Dead, and assuming I get a new contract, will really take hold in book four. This element did not come from any mythology or lore that I know of. If it is similar, it’s purely coincidental. Perhaps I’m going out on a limb in creating something out of thin air that has no basis in any supernatural history, but it’s been fun to develop, albeit difficult, because there is no base from which to work. On the plus side, I can’t get any of it “wrong.” On the negative, it might be straying too far from what is typically thought of within the urban fantasy genre. Regardless, it’s a risk worth taking and I’m having fun creating it, which as a writer, is something I find to be very important. I just hope that you all as readers will enjoy the ride.

I want to thank Lauren for having me here today, and in regard to the giveaway, if the winner of The Vengeful Dead has yet to read Deadworld, I still have some author copies and I’ll be happy to include that in the prize. Take care and happy reading everyone!

Guest Post Angela Larsen!

As you guys probably noticed, I missed Saturday pretty hard.  That’s going to be fixed soon, but is also not the reason I’m posting.  We’ve got a guest post today from the author of that very book.  Ms. Larsen’s been so kind as to write a guest post for us about character driven books, so I’m going to stop babbling and get to the part everyone’s here for.

CHARACTER DRIVEN

Guest post by YA Author, Angela Sage Larsen

 

“Suddenly there was a great burst of light through the Darkness. The light spread out and where it touched the Darkness the Darkness disappeared. The light spread until the patch of Dark Thing had vanished, and there was only a gentle shining, and through the shining came the stars, clear and pure,” writes Madeleine L’Engle in her classic, A Wrinkle in Time. Meg is one of my favorite literary characters of all time. She goes on a great journey through time and space to rescue her father, but really, of course, she rescues herself. What a great story line!

 

There are basically two kinds of story lines: plot-driven and character-driven. While I love a story that moves along and has a lot of action, I’m partial to the stories that are carried by strong characters (who find themselves in difficult situations, because let’s face it, every story has conflict). What they do in reaction to those situations not only gives us a glimpse into their soul, it impels the story forward and makes the plot that much more promising, as in A Wrinkle in Time. When I write (or read, for that matter) from the standpoint of well-developed characters, the plot becomes more exciting because it isn’t something that happens incidentally or outside of the characters, but it is a part of them. The plot almost seems like another character playing off of the protagonist.

 

As an author, I’m inspired to write narratives that are character-driven in another way, too. I’m passionate about stories that have a depth to them (OK, you can call them a message); but, most art does say something. I’m particularly vehement about characters who have, well…character (sorry, I really did use a Thesaurus, but that’s the only word that works!). Especially strong females who might find themselves in less than ideal situations but through their character they are defined, and find their true selves; the conflict does not define them, they are able to raise above it (which, of course, generally requires a struggle). I love the etymology of “character;” it comes from root words meaning, “engraved mark,” also “symbol or imprint on the soul,” “to engrave/pointed stake,” to the meaning extended by metaphor to “a defining quality.”

 

The idea of character is now more important than ever; not only in entertainment and literature for kids, young adults, and adults, but in life. We are being hounded by images and messages that would whittle us down to sex-crazed, depraved consumers, obsessed with material accoutrements and cheap quick fixes (maybe that’s the darkness Ms. L’Engle wrote about??). Unfortunately, these “defining qualities” are being spoon-fed especially to young girls. Anyone call tell you, when the doo-doo hits the fan, merely being pretty, skinny, or sexy ain’t gonna help (just ask Katniss Everdeen*). It’s quite a disservice to encourage–or maybe worse, remain apathetic about–these messages as being legit. Aren’t the best books about characters who buck the establishment and find their own way? We need more books for kids about girls who rebel against this perceived “normal” and find the true substance of themselves beyond the shallow husk of mere physicality.

 

Here are some of my favorite, character-driven middle grade/YA books:

Warriors Don’t Cry by Melba Pattilo Beals

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle

Anne of Green Gables by Lucy Montgomery

Island of the Blue Dolphins by Scott O’Dell

Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte

Little Women by Louisa May Alcott

The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank

Number the Stars by Lois Lowry

*The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins

Divergent by Veronica Roth

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Bio:

Angela grew up hearing “what a character!” practically every day (which may or may not have been complimentary). It rubbed off because her life is filled with characters and a search for character. She is the author of the brand new young adult series, Fifties Chix (FiftiesChix.com) about 5 time-traveling teens. The first book is called Travel to Tomorrow. She maintains a blog at AngelaSageLarsen.com.