Tag Archive: Ann Aguirre


Head ache tonight, took a nap after dinner and woke up past midnight.  Posting review anyway.  Enjoy!

Ellen Connor’s Nightfall is one of those books that I looked forward to because I wanted to see how one of the authors I really like’s style works with that of another author.  I’d never read anything by Carrie Lofty before this, read the book entirely because of Ann Aguirre’s involvement.   I enjoyed it a good deal in some parts, in others I wanted to scream at the main characters to sit down and talk instead of posturing and grousing at each other.  This is the third or so time I’ve started writing this review.  Each previous time I’ve tried to start with a plot summary without spoilers or ruining the ending.  Each time I’ve failed miserably and wound up rambling about Jenna and Mason’s unresolved sexual tension for three paragraphs.  It really wasn’t going anywhere, so I’m skipping the plot summary this week.

Both Jenna and Mason are damaged, though in different ways.  She came from a home where her father was seldom around and expected her mother to drop everything for him when he was there.  He was kid without a supportive family who fell in with, gasp, Jenna’s dad’s survival group and latched onto them.  Both of them crave something approaching normal while the world ends around them, but neither will admit that they need the other.  It got old pretty quickly, especially when Doctor Chris was introduced and Mason got territorial without saying anything about being attracted to Jenna.  The magical demon dogs were a cool idea as well as a great twist on werewolves.  The slow introduction of magic as something other than the demon dogs was interesting.  The minor characters were pretty awesome when they got to be in the scenes.  But never have I wanted so badly to whack the main characters.

I mentioned earlier that I had a tremendously difficult time trying to come up with a plot summary that wouldn’t spoil the ending.  I didn’t lie, even just going off of what the blurb referred to I would have to skip so much that it would seem stiff and confused.  Yes, Mason kidnaps Jenna to save her life and then more survivors show up.  Yes, Jenna and Mason have some kind of passionate bond between them and whatever magic is happening changes Jenna.  It’s more than that though.  Nightfall sets up the next two books, including what I’m pretty sure is the set up for the final in the trilogy.  It’s also a lot of navel gazing regarding why Jenna feels the need to defy Mason, why he’s drawn to her, and the nature of the new world.

So, how do I rate it?  I’m giving Nightfall a three out of five.  There was a bit much exposition for my taste and the explanations about what was going on got kind of repetitive,  but I’m also going to read the next two to see what happens next.

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I’ve got to admit right off the bat that I was really excited to read this book.  It’s the third in a series that I adore and I got to read it as one of the un-corrected galley copies.  I’m also stuck for good intros anymore.

Ann Aguirre’s Shady Lady is the third of her Corine Solomon series which has so far covered, among other things, drug cartels out for revenge, magic as a street weapon, demons and small towns, and messed up relationships.  Shady Lady doesn’t really do anything to change that.  Corine finds herself with the Montoya cartel is out for her blood because they can’t attack Min or her son, Chance.  This, unfortunately, pulls her way from the nice normal life she so desperately wants and thrusts her back into the role of not-quite heroine.  Along with Kel Ferguson, the Hand of God, Corine has to prove herself to one dangerous cartel boss in order to get Montoya out of her life permanently.

First off, I love the amount of character development Kel gets and how strong Corine is for most of the book.  Secondly, Corine’s emotional responses tend to ring more true than not.  I like the way that Corine worries about becoming a monster.  I wish she wasn’t quite so much of a broken record about it, but overall it is a good thing.  I like that Shannon responds to Corine’s less heroic decisions with something other than a stoic stiff upper lip, she worries about her friend and how far Corine’s going to go down the slippery slope.  I like that the book was relatively Chance free.  Corine thinks about him a lot sure, but she doesn’t moon over him like she had a tendency to do in the first two books.  She’s made her break from him and started to move on.  That said, Corine also does some really stupid things with little apparent planning or reason.  She gets lost in her own head a couple of times, resulting in the narrative being broken a bit as she slogs through her own emotions.

I’ve also got to admit that I was a bit disappointed in the ending, but that most of my problems with it will probably be tied up in a later novel.  I give Shady Lady a four out of five, and suggest picking up the series if at all possible.

Posting this now because I’m not sure if I’ll get the chance next weekend.  Really looking forward to the next one of these.  As to the contest mentioned as of the edit, over at the Smutketeers’ blog they’re giving away some nifty stuff to celebrate the release of  R.G. Alexander’s final new book of 2010, My Demon Saint.  Based on the blurb and the name of the blog, I’m expecting sex and computer games.  Fun right?

Every year there are a scattering of books that I really look forward to seeing released.  Ann Aguirre’s Killbox, the fourth Sirantha Jax novel, was one of them.  With the Farwan Corporation gone attacks on merchant ships have increased drastically and the Morgut are becoming a larger and larger threat as they strike and devour Federation settlements.  As a result the crew becomes central in the formation of the Federation Armada, which due to lack of funding or training is quickly filled with some of the same pirates that they are fighting.

I really liked the minor characters getting a bit more development in this one.  It was nice to see Dina and Hit become more three dimensional and less defined by their jobs on ship.  One of the most emotional scenes was effective because it was Dina showing vulnerability rather than any other character.  It is also great to see the dynamic between Vel and Jax further developed, though I am a bit worried that Vel’s being set up as the third corner of a romantic triangle.  Seeing Doc humanized felt like a bit of a missed moment, and I’m hoping that Aguirre will do more with him in the next book. I would have like to have seen more trouble with the pirates that were recruited, to all accounts they just fit right in with no problems based on old allegiances or places they had attacked. As a final note on characters, I was glad to see Aguirre bring back characters from the earlier books rather than just adding copies to the cast.

Killbox is a good deal more emotionally self-reflective than the previous three books which can get really old really fast.  Add that the reader is dealing with Jax’s emotions from inside her head and there are times where she feels like a different character from the Jax of Doubleblind.  Jax and March are still mostly worried about each other, but they aren’t allowed to do things their way anymore due to his being the Armada’s Commander.  Many of the plans used throughout the book are strictly regulated as opposed to having a plan but then winging it.  The more structured plans added another level of difference between Killbox and the previous installments in the series.  Even with both characters being irreplaceably important Jax and March still find time to do really idiotic, really heroic things throughout the book which is both irritating and endearing.  My biggest complaint on that has to be Jax’s habit of yo-yoing over her own decisions, especially towards the end.  Since it is from the middle of the series, I’m not going to suggest Killbox on its own.  It is a good read, but not standalone.  It isn’t the best of the Sirantha Jax novels so far, but is still an enjoyable book and I am quite looking forward to the next one.