Category: Young Adult


Alright everyone, I’ve got something awesome for you today. It’s a guest post from Leslie Hauser, author of Chasing Eveline! Enjoy!

Chasing Eveline cover

A lot of the focus of Chasing Eveline has been on the musical aspect. But when I was writing it, an equally important idea I wanted to develop was that of fading memories. How does one cope with loss and then with the fact that after while, our memories begin to lose some of their shine. It’s like a double loss.

 

Last summer marked the ten-year anniversary of my aunt’s death. I’ll never forget the last time I saw her alive. My parents and I just finished a round of golf with my uncle. My aunt didn’t play golf, but on this particular afternoon, she met us at a restaurant near the course for drinks after the round. She sparkled. That’s what I remember. Her blond hair was especially golden that day, and her bright blue eyes danced in step with her laughter, accentuated by the bright blue paisley shirt she wore. Or was it a blue-checkered shirt? No, I think maybe it had a blue floral design.

 

You see, I can’t remember anymore.

 

I thought I’d never forget that day, but it’s happening little by little. As the years pass, the photo in my memory is dissolving, and details that were once so clear are fuzzy and even lost completely.  And that scares me. What if someday I lose that memory of my aunt entirely?

 

It’s this idea of how our memories fade that I wanted to explore with Ivy in Chasing Eveline .We are often so sure of ourselves, saying I’ll never forget this moment. But we have no control over that clarity. Time is ultimately in charge. Ivy’s mom has left her, and all she has are her memories. But after two years, the details in Ivy’s mental slideshow aren’t so sharp anymore, and it scares her. It’s frightening to feel ourselves losing that tight grip on pictures and people who were once so clear in our minds. And it’s especially scary when these people are family members.

 

For so many years, my aunt was part of our family gatherings and holiday celebrations. She colored the events with all of her quirks. She stuck her finger right through the center of the creamed corn dish every Christmas to see if it was hot enough to put on the table. Her sighs of “Oh, Leslie…” to me or “Oh Natalie…” to my cousin or “Oh Barry…” to my dad were part of the soundtrack to every gathering. And she always showed up with a girdlebuster pie for dessert.

 

Since she’s passed away, we still all gather for holidays and celebrations, but it’s not quite the same. The scene is a little less colorful. There’s laughter, but it sounds different. There is still a girdlebuster pie on the table, but it looks different. I put my finger in the creamed corn to test its readiness, but it’s not as funny. Everything just feels different without her there.

 

When a family member leaves—whether it’s death or disappearance—there’s a void that can’t be filled. You can try to substitute, but it’s never the same. The dynamic is irrevocably changed, and you’re forced to forge a new path. But how do you move on in this new direction yet still try to keep the past alive in your mind? It’s tough, and I think it’s one of the most difficult things about losing someone, particularly a family member. It’s definitely what Ivy is struggling with.

 

Luckily for Ivy, she has music—a passion she gained from her mom. Music helps Ivy latch on to the best parts of her mom while giving her a positive outlet for the pain that could so easily overwhelm her. It’s a much needed life vest for her as she navigates the murky waters of loss.

 

So even though Ivy and I may forget what shirts our loved ones wore in our memory snapshots and we may never feel completely at ease in our new worlds absent of those we love, we know the sparkle that emanated from them can never be taken by Time. And it’s that remembrance that helps us find enjoyment in the new paths in front of us.

Leslie Hauser author picture

Author Bio:

Leslie Hauser teaches middle school English and history. She is a Midwesterner at heart—born in Cincinnati, Ohio—but currently resides in Los Angeles, California, with her dog Mr. Darcy. She loves cupcakes, coffee, and most of all—music. Her debut YA novel CHASING EVELINE released July 11, 2017. Visit Leslie at www.lesliehauser.com or on Twitter at @lhauser27.

I’m back, and I never left. But this is still a bit late, more things coming up this week. Progress is slow fixing that. I’m a little worried, but it’s workable. Also, there’s a review! Enjoy all.

FNaF The Silver Eyes cover

Ten years ago several children disappeared from Freddy Fazbear’s Pizzeria. Their bodies were never found. The restaurant closed and it’s owner committed suicide, seemingly from his inability to deal with his guilt. On the anniversary of one of the children’s death Charlie and several of her friends return to her home town to attend a memorial in his honor. Nostalgia turns to terror when she and her friends find the old pizzeria buried in an abandoned shopping mall and decide to investigate. Sometimes the past should stay forgotten. Some things never die.

So, Scott Cawthon and Kira Breed-Wrisley’s Five Nights at Freddy’s: The Silver Eyes is a bit of an interesting thing just as a concept. It’s a video game tie in novel, that isn’t canon to the games it ties into while still relying pretty heavily on the reader being familiar with the source material. The first part of that doesn’t hurt it for me, the second bit does though. In a lot of ways it’s like a cheesy horror movie in book form.

This isn’t a book that’s heavy on plot or character development, both things that I think really should have been worked on more. The plot is mostly an excuse to get our characters into the old Freddy Fazbear’s and is kind of a regurgitation of the third game’s story components. It doesn’t really do much to go into the murders themselves or the animatronics being haunted, that’s where I feel the meat of the story would have and should have been. Give me the characters having their nostalgia time and then trying to figure things out while dodging haunted robots. They could have also tightened up the ending to tie it in better.

That brings up the characters. Remember that comparison to a horror movie? That comes in big time with the cast. We get a lot of characters here, but only Charlie really matters for the vast bulk of the book. That leads to none of the cast getting a ton of development, which works in a movie with a dwindling cast but not so much here. It also leads to a couple of moments that feel out of nowhere because the characters involved weren’t acting like themselves, if the book had gone more into the supernatural stuff and used that as an explanation it could have worked, as it stands it really doesn’t.

That said, and bringing up that I read it because the games interest me, I did have fun reading this book. Part of that is that while the characters don’t work when it’s all of them together, because they kind of run together, the smaller scenes with just one or two characters really work at times. I enjoyed Charlie going back to her childhood home and seeing how things hadn’t changed in the house itself. That bit had really good character work and built tension well. The characters’ excitement over maybe seeing the old pizzeria again was great and could have worked into the horror really well.

So, where does this all leave Five Nights at Freddy’s: The Silver Eyes? While I had fun reading it, the book could have done a lot more with its material and its characters. Could have, but didn’t, and that’s really my big problem with it. I’d have liked to have seen a smaller, more developed cast and for the plot to show up faster and more coherently. For all that, I’m still giving it a three out of five. It could have done a lot more, but I still enjoyed it.

The Sitter

Hey, guess who’s reviewing a fourteen year old book! This gal! So, yeah, there might be some spoilers here. I tried to avoid them, but this was surprisingly hard to talk about without getting into what, specifically, made my reactions happen. I got really hung up on one thing, guess what it was. That’s pretty well it though. I’ll have another post up probably tomorrow or Friday. For now, enjoy!

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Ellie Saks is at the end of her lease, the end of her temp job, and the end of her patience with her mother and her ex-boyfriend turned stalker Clay. So, she jumps at the opportunity to leave the city behind for a trip to the Hamptons for a summer of fun away from it all. A stroke of luck even lands her a babysitting job and place to stay. That luck turns sour though when someone starts sending her threatening notes and disturbing gifts. With a disturbed child to care for, a stalker on the loose, and a ghost story unfolding with her in the middle of it can Ellie figure out what’s going on or even survive her summer as the sitter?

Not going to lie, I didn’t enjoy The Sitter. This is one of those books that feels so, so like a lot of the books I have tremendous nostalgia for but with all the nostalgia stripped away and a painful attempt at retargeting its readership. See, R. L. Stine does a great job with teen horror, particularly cheesy teen horror. His books can be very formula and very like a B horror movie, but they tend to be fun and quick and you know what you’re getting in to when you pick one up. That’s sort of the case here and with a few changes this could have been a pretty standard Fear Street book. That’s part of the problem though, with The Sitter Stine tries too hard to make his book “adult” and it feels very forced. There’s a fair amount of profanity, some drinking, a really gross sex scene, drug use is mentioned, but it all feels like someone reminded Stine that he was writing for grownups after the book was already finished, so he just threw that all in.

So, that said, what made me dislike this book other than the audience related weirdness? There are a lot of things that get a pass in teen novels that shouldn’t and don’t in adult novels, this book for example had terrible foreshadowing. Early on, we find out about Ellie’s cat, he’s sweet and trusting and she misses him so because she couldn’t have him in her apartment. Yeah, he didn’t make it to the end of the book. The problem with that is twofold. Stine’s used killing the beloved family pet to gain a quick cheep hit to the feels before, several times actually, so as soon as the cat gets mentioned you know what’s going to happen. It’s a similar thing with the big twist at the end. It also ties into my next big issue.

A ton of terrible stuff happens between Lucky’s introduction and Lucky’s plot appointed death, but Ellie doesn’t seem to take that into account. The book’s plot was almost entirely reliant on the protagonist making stupid choices. Again, a lot of those choices would have made more sense in a book with a teenaged protagonist rather than one in her twenties both because relative youth and because a teen protagonist could be stuck being the sitter rather than it being a summer job. This bit is really hard to go into without spoilers, but our protagonist gets death threats and vile stuff mailed to her. She stays, doesn’t even talk to the police after like the second thing. Not for the threats, or her cat getting killed, or her stalker ex showing up and threatening her. Most of the tension in the book relies on the reader having never read R. L. Stine before and Ellie being an idiot.

Add to that, The Sitter has a ton of stuff going on that doesn’t seem to go anywhere until the end. There are chapters from the antagonist’s view point. They could have been cut entirely. There was a side plot about some curse on the guest house. That could have been cut. Clay probably should have been cut, he doesn’t really add much to the story and is basically made of cringe. The cat could have been cut, he was a completely pointless inclusion. Any of that could have been removed to tighten up the main plot and work the twist in better.

Those are my big issues with the book, everything else kind of spins off of those. It had a twist ending, but that was completely unsupported by the rest of the book. The only reason I didn’t see it coming was that it was so completely out of left field it came from another game entirely. It’s silly in the grand scheme of things, but this book made me angry. There were so many places where Stine could have done better, could have not done the blatantly obvious thing, could have shored up the writing instead of going into another side plot. This book gets a one, as much for what it could have been as for what it is.

Trapped in Wonderland

So this is late by a couple hours. Better than days or weeks, but still. I was sent a copy of Trapped in Wonderland by the author, Dani Hoots, for an honest review as part of a blog tour. She’s been great to work with and I hope you all enjoyed her guest post earlier today. Enjoy!

The first time Alice visited Wonderland she had been shoved in a locker. The second time she had to be rescued from the White Rabbit. Now she’s trapped in a world like a dream with four boys from her school who are, it turns out, characters from the story. But dreams are dying and it will be up to Alice to save both Wonderland and her own world from the Cirque de Reves and their mysterious leader.

Dani Hoots’ Trapped in Wonderland is something of a new spin on an old classic. The Alice here is not the original Alice who told her story to Lewis Carroll. Wonderland is different, being ruled by the Kingdom of Dreams and sectioned into Zones. Also the Mad Hatter, Cheshire Cat, Doormouse, and March Hare are all cute boys. It’s different from the original, but still feels very familiar on a lot of levels.

I admit, this book frustrates me and I think a lot of that comes down to it feeling very like young. It has a lot of new writer problems like stilted dialogue and a lot of unnecessary details that could have been removed to improve the pacing. Most of the little details, like what manga Alice was reading, could have gone while keeping bigger things, like her getting up early to fix her own lunch because she wants to have a bento box. The book sort of waffles between things that build Alice’s character and things that just fill space on the page. There’s also a lot of repetitiveness and contradiction when it comes to certain things. The reader keeps being reminded both that Alice does ballet but is still super clumsy, or that she’s pretty sure that Wonderland is just a dream. It leads to the book feeling like it was originally posted as each chapter was finished rather than as a whole.

There’s this weird sort of conflict of character with regard to Alice and her family as well. It’s sort of a tie in to the plot itself. Her older sisters are both smart and successful, one is a med student and the other is studying physics. Her parents are both CPAs. None of them care about Alice’s art or her dancing or her interests. These things are, according to Alice at least, treated as pointless hobbies or something to be taken away from her if her grades drop. They want her to give up her dreams and become like them, but then these same parents who don’t seem to care about any of her interests also seem to be paying for all those interests. She’s going to ballet classes, has adequate supplies for her art, and has the food around to make her bento boxes. It feels like something written by a fairly young writer venting about their own life. It could be a really good real world tie in to the main plot if more was done with it or if her family was written more sympathetically, but as is it doesn’t work.

My feelings on this book ultimately wind up being fairly meta. The writing itself does feel very fan fic-ish or, again, like it was written by someone either very young or just not used to writing. There are a ton of references to pop culture, particularly anime and manga, that can get really distracting and make the book feel weirdly dated. There’s some issues with the editing that could have used a second going over. There’s a lot of potential here and, with Mrs. Hoots having written several other books, I’d definitely give one of her other books a go. Plus a couple of the characters were a lot of fun if a little stock and I completely love a couple of the concepts used.

So, where does that leave me? While I’ve had a lot of issues with the book it didn’t leave me feeling like I’d wasted the time reading it. It isn’t good, but it shows a lot of potential and leaves me hoping it’s an older project that’s just not getting its turn or a genre the author isn’t entirely comfortable with. That all taken into consideration, I’m giving Trapped in Wonderland a two out of five with the note that it could be a solid three with more editing and some cuts.

Guest Post Dani Hoots

Alright everyone, I’ve got a guest post for you today from Dani Hoots, author of Trapped in Wonderland. Review for that will be up a little later today. Enjoy!

Thank you Lauren for letting me write a post about what drew me to the theme of Wonderland. I am very grateful to be here and hope that you and your followers enjoy my post.

 

I decided to write a piece based on Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland because of my love for everything “mad”. Wonderland, to me, is a place where the misfits, the outcasts in society, those who are deemed “crazy” can be themselves. I grew up being bullied for being different and loving nerdy things, strange things, and I found myself always escaping to a different world in my mind. To me, Wonderland is a place just like that, so I found myself quoting and loving everything Wonderland.

 

Not only is it somewhere for us “mad” people, it is also a place where we aren’t expect to know where we are going. A lot of people don’t know what the future holds, and as the Cheshire Cat says, “If you don’t know where you are going, any road will get you there”. I think this is a great quote to think about if you find yourself stuck. Just keep moving, keep pushing forward no matter where you are going. Sometimes we start to lose confidence and that is okay. Just keep fighting to fight that is life and you can find your way. 

 

These two themes that are present in Wonderland and are the main reasons I am so drawn to it. I also fell in love with the manga “Alice in the Country of Hearts”, which is based off of a Japanese love sim game (I’m a sucker for love sims, go ahead and judge me). A lot of ideas were inspired by that series and I definitely recommend it if you like manga or anything Wonderland-themed.

 

My favorite characters in Alice’s Adventure’s in Wonderland are the Cheshire Cat and the Mad Hatter, which when you read the novel you will definitely see. The ironic and interesting thing is I found out after marrying my husband and started doing research of his ancestry, that his original name from Germany wasn’t “Hoots” but was in fact “Huth” which means “hat” in German. Their coat of arms is a white background with a black top hat and a big red heart on top of it. I literally married the Mad Hatter and I think that is wonderful.

 

I also think that all of us have a little Alice in us. I love adventure, and love to question everything. We just need to remember to keep our curiosity as we grow older. I think it is hard in today’s society, but it is really important. Curiosity definitely drives me to research and write, so I hope you all keep a little curiosity in whatever you do throughout life. 

 

So I hope you all enjoy my post and my novel Trapped in Wonderland. If you have any questions of comments, feel free to visit me on my Facebook page or my website.

 

The Bad Boy Bargain Tour Banner.png

Hello everyone. I’ve got a guest post or from the author of The Bad Boy Bargain. This is actually part of a blog tour, so if you’re interested, check out the other blogs on the tour. Enjoy!

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How a Song Launched an Entire Book

 

I find inspiration for books in a lot of places, but The Bad Boy Bargain was probably the most unusual. Last year, when she heard “Please” by Sawyer Fredericks (from The Voice), my editor, Heather Howland, had an idea for a new YA romance. She posted her thoughts on Twitter—shy guy with a tough shell—and said she wished someone would write it. When I asked when she wanted the manuscript, teasing but also dead serious, we started plotting.

 

“Please” tells the story of a young man who’s found a near-perfect girl, one he thinks he loves, but he’s lying to her at the same time. He’s scared to tell this near-perfect girl the truth about himself because he’s worried she’ll let him go. It’s a song about love and fear, giving and selfishness, longing and despair. All those themes show up in The Bad Boy Bargain, which lends some extra complexity to Kyle beyond the typical bad boy. He’s a guy full of secrets, pain, and shame, but he reallywants someone to see through all of that and love the true Kyle. The working title of the book was called Keeping Faith—because he wants to keep Faith, but needs more faith in himself.

 

As for Faith herself, she’s been mistreated by one guy and has some reservations about being hurt again. The difference between Faith and Kyle is that she’s willing to continue to look for The One even though she’s been burned. She believes in true love, acting with kindness, and being her real self. She suffers from a lack of confidence and self doubt, and Kyle helps her get past that, especially when she struggles with a dance partner who refuses to do his part. Having him in her life restores her faith in love, and in herself.

 

Overall, this story is about two people finding each other and connecting in a way that allows them to be true with each other.

Missed a day there. Nothing really big happened, the spooks freaked out a little when a friend came over. I think they aren’t fans of new people. Going to work up something to fix that. Any way, on to the review!

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Forty-five years have passed since Benjamin Fier had an innocent girl and her mother burned at the stake. Forty-five years have passed since Matthew Fier robbed the girl’s father of everything he had with false promises. Forty-five years have passed since a curse was cast from betrayal and a mourning father’s grief. Following his great uncle’s notes Ezra Fier seeks the last of the Goodes to have revenge for his family’s downfall. Another link in the chain of vengeance is forged.

The Secret is R. L. Stine’s second book in the Fear Street Saga trilogy. Sometime after the end of the first book Ezra Fier has dragged his family to Wickham village in search of vengeance, only to fine the village empty of all but the dead. That makes Ezra great material for a villain, but I feel like I want more of why he’s so driven for revenge. Guy has a family, including protagonist Jonathan, which he drags along on his quest. I think that’s a big part of where this one falls apart for me.

See a big thing with The Secret is that, while we’re left with an Ezra who is totally out for revenge at the end of The Betrayal, a ton is left out from point A to point B. If his whole life is revenge, then when did he stop and court his wife, Jane? What kind of notes of Matthew’s is he following that it’s taken him this long to get to Wickham? It’s just kind of weak writing because the plot requires it. Ezra has to have a wife and kids so that there’s room for both a body count and enough Fiers to get through to modern Shadyside. It has to take awhile so that Jonathan is old enough that we have a relatable protagonist. That kind of works out for me, I don’t like it because it feels weak, but it works.

The bit after the century long time skip is where that weakness just kind of goes off the rails for me. After a hundred years of the curse not acting up in any way that is important enough to show, it wakes back up stronger than ever. We get the actually completely innocent Fier family, living happily in their ancestral home, taking in a charming drifter. The drifter is, of course, a Goode out for revenge because the plot demands it. Not just a Goode though, the last Goode, who watched his entire family die of apparently nothing so the Fiers must be at fault. This whole section of the book gives me so many issues.

Frank Goode blames the Fier family for his family dying, but we haven’t seen enough from the Goode side of things to know their feelings on the curse or feud. We don’t even actually know enough to know that there are any Goodes still alive until Frank shows up, but we’re shown a bunch of times that he’s been planning this for a long while. I feel like this could have been so much stronger if we were given more from the Goode family perspective, especially since way back in the first book George wanted nothing to do with his father’s revenge scheme. I want to know what made Frank grab on to the curse as a reason for his misfortune so hard. I want this bearing in mind that over the course of a century the Fier family itself completely forgot about the curse. Either that or I’d have liked to have seen the curse angle pushed harder rather than it being suddenly a Goode out of nowhere.

As to what was done specifically well, I liked Jonathan as a protagonist. I liked that Ezra was cast in a bad light because of his obsession with revenge on people he’d never met. The end to Jonathan’s section I thought worked really well for his character. The post time skip Fiers being legitimately kindly people and the implied happy childhood for their kids was great.

Right, so that’s a lot of words. What’s the verdict though? Ulitmately I don’t think The Secret is as good a book as The Betrayal, and it doesn’t really work well enough as a standalone novel to not get that comparison. Where it’s weak, it’s really weak. Where it works well, it still tends to be kind of thin. That said, I did read it in a single sitting without forcing myself in the least. So that happened too. In the end, it gets a three out of five for not being a bad book but also being one that could have used a lot of expanding upon.

So, day one of posting stuff for Halloween. I’m pretty excited, not gonna lie. Even the spooks around the apartment have quieted down some, either they’re getting used to us or they’re getting ready for Halloween too. But, regardless, on to the review!

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Fear Street is cursed. Since Shadyside’s founding, the town and the street bearing the name of its most infamous residents have been haunted by murderers, vengeful ghosts, and all manner of horrors. When an innocent girl is burned as a witch, the first link in a chain of vengeance that will span centuries is forged. A curse is cast, and a legend begins.

The Betrayal begins at the end with Nora Goode staring in horror and disbelief as the Fear family mansion burns down, taking her beloved Daniel with it. The story, however, begins over two hundred years earlier in the village of Wickham in the middle of a witch scare as several girls have already been burned at the stake. A girl, Susannah Goode, is framed for witchcraft by her beloved’s father, Magistrate Benjamin Fier. She and her, also accused, mother are innocent. Her father however is not and, after having his family taken from him and being robbed by the Fier brothers, William Goode vows revenge and places a curse on the Fier family.

Right off the bat, this is pretty gory for a kids’/YA book, and that fits the Fear Street Saga trilogy pretty well. It also does a good job with build, even knowing how things ultimately end there’s this sort of looming sense of waiting for the other shoe to drop. I think a good part of that is that our protagonist for most of the post betrayal book, Mary Fier, had nothing to do with that whole situation. She hadn’t even been born yet and is just a girl. Even knowing what her father and uncle did, having her as the protagonist makes the rest of the Fier family look better because she cares for them.

Unfortunately, while I do adore Mary as a protagonist for what she does for the story, The Betrayal is still very much set up for the other two books. The ending also feels a bit rushed, like Stine knew where his start was and where the ending was but he only had a certain number of pages he was allowed. It gets the point across, but it also feels pretty cheesy.

So, I know that my review and score here are ultimately pretty heavily influenced by nostalgia, but even rereading this as an adult I enjoyed it a great deal. So, The Betrayal by R. L. Stine gets a four out of five. Let’s see what happens next.

I mentioned figuring out what I was planning to do here for Halloween earlier, so I figured I should talk about it a bit.

So, back in the nineties and early aughts R. L. Stine’s Fear Street novels were the slightly more mature option to the Goosebumps books if you were a kid and wanted to read horror novels. For the most part they were pretty good, kind of formula after awhile but not unforgivably so, and genuinely fun to read to boot. So of course, as a kid, when I had the chance to read the origins of Fear Street I jumped at the chance. I never actually finished the Fear Street Saga trilogy back then, I wimped out.

That’s a lie. I got so scared that I quit reading the trilogy and split the books apart so that they couldn’t scare me any more. I gave one to a friend that I haven’t talked to in forever. Another I donated to the library of a school I wouldn’t attend until much later. As to what happened to the last book, I don’t remember in the least. It could be on a shelf at my parents’ house waiting to be opened and to allow terror to spill forth once more.

Alright, got a little purple prose-y there, but point made. Right? This trilogy scared my child self to pieces in ways that no other book I’d read at the time had been able to. So badly that I apparently decided that a fantasy novel approach to a mass market printed book was the most logical thing possible.

And the nature of fear fascinates me, especially my own. So what to do about a series like that? Read it as an adult of course. I want to see what freaked me out so badly and if it still does. So, for Halloween, I’m reading the Fear Street Saga trilogy!

Alright everybody, I’ve got  another giveaway for you courtesy of authors Bob Kat! It’s for the fifth book in their Time Shifters series, Not My Life.

In Not My Life our time traveling heroes will have to find what happened to their friend Dan Denucci to take him from a man with a medical degree, beautiful wife, and a son to the sad homeless man living under the pier.

So, your question to enter, if you could travel back in time what would you do with that power? A follow up question if you feel like getting into it, would you assume a stable time line or a changeable one?

Standard rules apply here. You’ll need to follow the blog and the comment on this post answering the entry question. The contest runs from the time of posting until next Friday the 28th and the winner will be selected using random.com.

Separate from that, the authors also have a giveaway of their own going on to celebrate the book’s release, I’ll use their words to tell you all about it.

To celebrate the launch of NOT MY LIFE, we’re giving away a very special heart-shaped mother-of-pearl shell necklace.  (The photo doesn’t do it justice.)  It is 18” long.  All you have to do is send us an email at Kathy@nightwriter93.com with your name, email address, and the words SHELL NECKLACE.  You will be entered into the drawing that will be held on December 1, 2016.  The winner will be notified by email.

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