Category: Guest Post


Guest Post: T.E. Carter

I don’t remember when I became interested in telling stories. I almost feel like it’s just part of my DNA. My earliest memories are of books, plays, movies, etc. When I was only three, my aunt and uncle took me to see my first Broadway show, and that resulted in my reenactment of the play for months to follow. I’ve always loved making things up, which is only generally acceptable in storytelling!

Growing up, writing was something I did for myself. I can’t say I ever really saw myself as a writer or that I ever believed I’d be an author, because I wasn’t writing for any reason because I had to do it. I needed to get all the ideas out of my head and onto paper.

When I first decided I wanted to do something with my writing, I wasn’t ready. I finished a novel and although I spent a significant amount of time on critique groups and editing, I didn’t have the ability yet to filter out feedback and so the novel was a bit of a Frankenstein’s monster of a story. It was five people’s different takes on how the story should go and as a result, it was beyond unwieldy. For someone who tends to write short, it’s kind of funny to me to see this 130K word monster on my hard drive.

From there, I continued to write but I wasn’t really sure what I envisioned that to mean for me personally. Writing was a compulsion, but publishing was just a fantasy. From time to time, I would submit something to a magazine or query an agent, but I felt like I was spinning my wheels and I wasn’t active enough to say that I was pursuing publication.

Eventually, I did take the leap – and I failed miserably. I’m not ashamed to admit it, because the end result was better writing and a stronger sense of what mattered to me as a writer. I’ve completed somewhere between 15 and 20 novels to date (because some were merged with others and some are in a questionable state of completeness, I do have a hard time settling on a real number with any accuracy). Of those, I queried five before my 2018 YA debut. One was the Frankenstein’s monster novel, because I was naïve! After that, it was almost 15 years before I tried again. When I started querying this time, I found varying levels of success. One novel yielded no results, two received a lot of partial requests and some small successes but nothing of any significance, and one actually got a number of requests but eventually, it was shelved because it didn’t resonate with anyone. By this point, my passion for writing had started to wane as well and I realized I’d become so focused on the wrong things. I didn’t love it anymore, and so I walked away from writing.

For several months, I wrote nothing down. I couldn’t even find that part of myself that drove me to tell stories. But sooner or later, it caught its spark again and while I wasn’t ready to start writing yet, I did find myself thinking more about ideas. After about a year, I began drafting some chapters and concepts. It wasn’t the same focused and determined writing I’d become accustomed to, but I had started to lose myself in words again and for that, I was grateful. It helped me to put the rest aside and a few months after that, I had decided that I would write because I needed to and publication would not be a part of my journey.

When I finished I STOP SOMEWHERE, I knew something was special about it. It was the first story I remembered writing with no strings attached. For the last few years, every word I’d written had carried with it the weight of the long-term and big picture approach. Was this marketable? Would an agent or publisher like it? Was it “good enough?” With this novel, though, I didn’t care about those things when drafting– because I had no intention of publishing it. Once it was done, however, I felt like maybe it was worth taking one last chance on my dreams. I told no one and I began the next steps toward that process, finally sending it out to a pool of agents in late February 2016.

In less than 24 hours, I already had a request and I signed with my agent just over a week later – after having a number of agents read and request. It was a whirlwind and then, I had an offer from a publisher in three weeks. I hadn’t expected such a quick turnaround since the content is dark and I know the book straddles a weird line between YA and adult fiction, so I wasn’t sure how it would work from a publisher’s standpoint. Clearly, I was wrong, though, and now I have another two titles contracted with the same publisher.

The biggest thing this taught me was not about following your dreams or persevering in the face of adversity, despite that being the takeaway to some degree. What this experience taught me was that passion needs to come first. When writing no longer held that same joy for me, I needed to walk away and I resolve to do that if it happens to me again in the future. I STOP SOMEWHERE was the result not of determination, but of reigniting my love for a story and my commitment to telling the story I wanted to tell regardless of outside feedback, publishing chances, or the likelihood of success. I also feel that my focus on writing for myself and for the pure love of it has allowed me to create something that resonates, far more than worrying about writing for approval.

As a result, I am prouder of this novel than of anything I’ve ever written previously. Not because it’s the one that yielded the most external success, but because it provided me with the most internal satisfaction and joy to create.

First autumn frost on Stinging Nettle leaves - France  -  -  -

Bio:

 

TE Carter was born in New England and has pretty much lived in New England her entire life (minus a few years in high school). She still lives in New England with her husband and their two cats. When she’s not writing, she can usually be found reading classic literature, playing Xbox, organizing her comic collection, or binge-watching baking competitions.

 

Social Links:

 

Website: http://tecarter.com

Twitter: http://twitter.com/tecarter7

Instagram: http://instagram.com/tecarterbooks

Facebook: http://facebook.com/tecarterbooks

 

Book Info:

 

I STOP SOMEWHERE

Publisher: Feiwel & Friends/Macmillan (North America – 2/27/18)

Simon & Schuster UK (UK – April 2018)

 

Ellie Frias disappeared long before she vanished.

 

Tormented throughout middle school, Ellie begins her freshman year with a new look: she doesn’t need to be popular; she just needs to blend in with the wallpaper.

 

But when the unthinkable happens, Ellie finds herself trapped after a brutal assault. She wasn’t the first victim and now she watches it happen again and again. She tries to hold on to her happier memories in order to get past the cold days, waiting for someone to find her.

 

The problem is, no one searches for a girl they never noticed in the first place.

 

TE Carter’s stirring and visceral debut not only discusses and dismantles rape culture, but it makes you slow down and think about what it is to be human.

 

Goodreads Link: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/29751533-i-stop-somewhere

Purchase Pages:

North America: http://us.macmillan.com/books/9781250124647

UK: http://www.simonandschuster.co.uk/books/I-Stop-Somewhere/T-E-Carter/9781471167782

Advertisements

Guest Post: Tom Doyle

Hey all, I’ve got a guest post for you today from an author who’s been on here once before. You can find that post here. I’ve read the first book in his War and Craft trilogy and enjoyed it enough to track down a copy for my younger cousin. So, that said, enjoy!

To Say Farewell: On Concluding a Trilogy

Three years ago, I found a lump on my throat while shaving. The timing seemed particularly perverse–after years of struggle, my first novel, American Craftsmen, would soon be published. The launch party for the book should’ve been one of the happiest moments in my life; instead, I had a growing certainty that my days were numbered. Within days of the party, my diagnosis and existential dread were confirmed: cancer, and it had spread to the lymph nodes in my neck.

For a child of the ‘70s like me, raised on terminal disease tear-jerkers like Brian’s Song, that should have been the beginning of the end of my story. I was ready to say my farewells.

Instead, somewhat to my embarrassment, a combination of Star Trek technology and medieval unpleasantness has cured me. By cured, I mean it’s now over 99% more likely that something other than that particular cancer will kill me. With whiplash force and the mildest touch of PTSD, I went from a rapidly narrowing horizon of time to a vista of many years.

What does this have to do with completing a trilogy about magician-soldiers and psychic spies? Plenty. When I was diagnosed, I’d already submitted the second book, The Left-Hand Way, to my editor. My only bucket list item wasn’t travel or a new experience; it was finishing book three, War and Craft. I had visions of writing to the very end, like Ulysses S. Grant with his memoirs as his throat cancer strangled him.

However, unlike what many former patients say, cancer didn’t so much change my worldview as reinforce my existing one. I’ve always had some awareness that my grip on life and creative work is tenuous and shouldn’t be taken for granted. Also, we’re a society of first impressions, but cancer reminded me that how we say good-bye can be just as important, particularly when good-bye is all that’s left.

If I have one new lesson from my cancer experience, it’s this: what a great gift it is to end things appropriately.

Other authors and fans seem to have issues with the problem of mortality. Readers worry that, like Robert Jordan, George R.R. Martin will not finish his series before ill-health or age permanently intervenes. The response to those pestering Martin that “He’s not working for you” is more false than true. As Bob Dylan pointed out, whether we like it or not, we’ve all got to serve somebody. Or to rephrase in the starkest terms of the Game of Thrones worldview, all men must die is intrinsically connected to the idea that all men must serve. In the end, we all must serve the one true god whose name is Death. Those that tell Martin to take as much time as he likes may be enabling artistic failure.

On the other end of the spectrum, some readers don’t care about endings–they would rather a series continue forever. This tends to be an immersive style of reader, who simply wants more and more subcreation within the fictional world. But that’s never been my goal, mostly because, with the possible exception of Middle Earth and all its backstory and author’s notes, I don’t enjoy reading that sort of endless series. Instead, I’ve brought my story to the definite conclusion I wanted. I’ve left some room for reader imagination of what happens next in the craftspeople universe; readers don’t need me for that anymore. But the story this trilogy had to tell is done.

Knowing that the larger narrative would be a trilogy gave me a helpful framework and limit. What this meant structurally is that each of my novels has a standalone plot told from a different craftsperson’s point of view–that character being the one who changes the most in the course of the novel–but there’s also a set of trilogy arcs that I’ve brought to a full resolution. The trilogy structure also gave me a surprise. If there’s a main trilogy character–again, the character that changes the most over the course of the series–it’s not any of the main protagonists of the individual books. See if you can guess who I think that is.

For those readers who’d like to see more about the craftspeople, I offer the following: there’s no bar to me returning to that universe, particular for short excursions, and I’d enjoy chatting with you about various aspects of their world. Also, if I ever return to it in longer form, I think that future book will benefit from the pause.

So, ave atque vale, craftspeople. Hail and farewell. Thank you for being the unfinished business that tethered me to earth when it seemed I might be the one departing. Also, thank you, readers, for coming with me on these journeys, both the one in the books and the personal one I’ve just told you about.

#

Tom Doyle is the author of a contemporary fantasy trilogy from Tor Books. In the first book, American Craftsmen, two modern magician-soldiers fight their way through the legacies of Poe and Hawthorne as they attempt to destroy an undying evil–and not kill each other first. In the sequel, The Left-Hand Way, the craftsmen are hunters and hunted in a global race to save humanity from a new occult threat out of America’s past. In the third book, War and Craft (Sept. 2017), it’s Armageddon in Shangri-La, and the end of the world as we know it.

Some of Tom’s award-winning short fiction is collected in The Wizard of Macatawa and Other Stories. He writes in a spooky turret in Washington, DC. You can find the text and audio of many of his stories on his website, http://www.tomdoylewriter.com.

Alright everyone, I’ve got something awesome for you today. It’s a guest post from Leslie Hauser, author of Chasing Eveline! Enjoy!

Chasing Eveline cover

A lot of the focus of Chasing Eveline has been on the musical aspect. But when I was writing it, an equally important idea I wanted to develop was that of fading memories. How does one cope with loss and then with the fact that after while, our memories begin to lose some of their shine. It’s like a double loss.

 

Last summer marked the ten-year anniversary of my aunt’s death. I’ll never forget the last time I saw her alive. My parents and I just finished a round of golf with my uncle. My aunt didn’t play golf, but on this particular afternoon, she met us at a restaurant near the course for drinks after the round. She sparkled. That’s what I remember. Her blond hair was especially golden that day, and her bright blue eyes danced in step with her laughter, accentuated by the bright blue paisley shirt she wore. Or was it a blue-checkered shirt? No, I think maybe it had a blue floral design.

 

You see, I can’t remember anymore.

 

I thought I’d never forget that day, but it’s happening little by little. As the years pass, the photo in my memory is dissolving, and details that were once so clear are fuzzy and even lost completely.  And that scares me. What if someday I lose that memory of my aunt entirely?

 

It’s this idea of how our memories fade that I wanted to explore with Ivy in Chasing Eveline .We are often so sure of ourselves, saying I’ll never forget this moment. But we have no control over that clarity. Time is ultimately in charge. Ivy’s mom has left her, and all she has are her memories. But after two years, the details in Ivy’s mental slideshow aren’t so sharp anymore, and it scares her. It’s frightening to feel ourselves losing that tight grip on pictures and people who were once so clear in our minds. And it’s especially scary when these people are family members.

 

For so many years, my aunt was part of our family gatherings and holiday celebrations. She colored the events with all of her quirks. She stuck her finger right through the center of the creamed corn dish every Christmas to see if it was hot enough to put on the table. Her sighs of “Oh, Leslie…” to me or “Oh Natalie…” to my cousin or “Oh Barry…” to my dad were part of the soundtrack to every gathering. And she always showed up with a girdlebuster pie for dessert.

 

Since she’s passed away, we still all gather for holidays and celebrations, but it’s not quite the same. The scene is a little less colorful. There’s laughter, but it sounds different. There is still a girdlebuster pie on the table, but it looks different. I put my finger in the creamed corn to test its readiness, but it’s not as funny. Everything just feels different without her there.

 

When a family member leaves—whether it’s death or disappearance—there’s a void that can’t be filled. You can try to substitute, but it’s never the same. The dynamic is irrevocably changed, and you’re forced to forge a new path. But how do you move on in this new direction yet still try to keep the past alive in your mind? It’s tough, and I think it’s one of the most difficult things about losing someone, particularly a family member. It’s definitely what Ivy is struggling with.

 

Luckily for Ivy, she has music—a passion she gained from her mom. Music helps Ivy latch on to the best parts of her mom while giving her a positive outlet for the pain that could so easily overwhelm her. It’s a much needed life vest for her as she navigates the murky waters of loss.

 

So even though Ivy and I may forget what shirts our loved ones wore in our memory snapshots and we may never feel completely at ease in our new worlds absent of those we love, we know the sparkle that emanated from them can never be taken by Time. And it’s that remembrance that helps us find enjoyment in the new paths in front of us.

Leslie Hauser author picture

Author Bio:

Leslie Hauser teaches middle school English and history. She is a Midwesterner at heart—born in Cincinnati, Ohio—but currently resides in Los Angeles, California, with her dog Mr. Darcy. She loves cupcakes, coffee, and most of all—music. Her debut YA novel CHASING EVELINE released July 11, 2017. Visit Leslie at www.lesliehauser.com or on Twitter at @lhauser27.

Hey all, I’ve got a post for you from Eugenia Jefferson, author of Confessions of a Frustrated Millennial. Enjoy!

Hello everyone! My name is Eugenia R. Jefferson and I’m author of Confessions of a Frustrated Millennial. It’s a book about three black millennial women who are trying to navigate post-college life and achieve their dreams.

 

How I came to write this book has been an interesting, yet long journey. When I was little I dreamed of becoming a writer. I wrote short stories as a girl and I enjoyed reading. However, as I got older I started to realize that just being a writer wouldn’t bring in “money” so when I went off to college I decided to major in journalism and then went back and got my master’s degree in Integrated Marketing Communications.

 

The first job I landed after my master’s degree was a marketing communications coordinator at a non-profit association. I absolutely hated my job. I was nitpicked on and every mistake I made was taken to HR. Eventually, they let me go and I fell in a deep depression.

 

It was one of my biggest failures. I was searching for a new job and it seemed like nothing was happening for me. While unemployed, I decided to return back to my first love of writing. That’s when I started to develop the characters Natasha, Danielle and Jayla. All of them had a piece of me even though their stories are all different. The more I started to write the more cathartic it was. I was frustrated where I was in life at the time, but the more I shaped my own characters, the more I started to trust the process in my own life. I knew God was writing my story as I was writing my character’s story. I wrote the book on and off while in between freelancing jobs. However, I finally finished at the end of 2015.

 

While this book highlights some of the uncertainties that millennials go through, I feel that the subject is broader than that. It’s for anybody who’s about to give up on a dream. It’s for the person who has anxiety about where their life is going. It’s for the new graduate who doesn’t know what they want to do in their life.

 

Life is a process and while some parts are harder than others it’s a beautiful journey – good and bad.

 

Confession of a Frustrated Millennial is available through Amazon (paperback and Kindle) and Barnes & Noble.

Guest Post Tarrah Anders

Hey all, I’ve got a guest post for you today from Tarrah Anders, the author of Frozen Over. Enjoy!

Hi! I’m Tarrah. A little background on me if we aren’t already acquainted:

I am a born and raised California girl, constant daydreamer, yet also a doer. My day job consists of managing subsidies for the homeless, and wrangling my toddler, step-daughter and husband into working together without utter chaos. Whereas my moonlighting gig is that writing some steamy words late into the night or randomly during the day.
I have a thing for monkeys, Scott Eastwood and guys with tattoos.

I’ve been writing since I was in middle school and throughout college. While it was a passion, I kept it under wraps and never vocalized or followed through with my desire to be a writer, until I read a horrible book and thought: ‘I could do better than that!’ And so I did.

I start out by writing the first chapter or few pages; I get my hook in there and then branch out from there. I’m an in-betweener – not a full on pantser or outliner – but I operate on the edge of both. Sometimes, I will sit and write for an entire day or sometimes I will go days without writing, those days drive me insane.

My writing style is that I try to keep on earth. I try my best to not be too unrealistic with my characters, what they do and how they live. I want my books to be relatable and not to create too many eye rolls, like when a character starts calling his love interest baby after knowing her for 5 minutes.  I mean c’mon – I’ve been married for almost six years and I still never call my husband “baby”!

I kept my writing romance from my husband for nearly two years, but finally told him because… royalties and taxes. He immediately tried to skip forward to any steamy scenes, then referred to the moment as in Lethal Weapon 4. My husband and I have a fun relationship, we’re both very sarcastic people and well, I was nervous to tell him that I moonlight in the romance author area purely due to him teasing me for reading the books in the first place. He now sporadically asks questions, but still manages to poke fun at me.

I’ve written and self-published 4 books and one novella (coming March 14th). They’re all dual point of view aside from the novella. Thematically, the novels are friends to lovers, random hook-ups and office romances mixed with a whole lot of fun in the middle.

So this brings me to my current book that is out. It’s titled: Frozen Over. It’s storyline is about a normal girl, who struggles to make ends meet with two jobs, and catching the attention of the owner of a modeling job she’s working on. While he struggles with his past, she makes his gooey warm center ooze and turns him from playboy to devoted boyfriend. There are of course obstacles and things trying to tear them apart, but they do reach their Happily Ever After. Tyson is your standard cocky playboy who doesn’t care for anyone’s feelings aside his own or those close to him, who is the CEO of a once dying fashion company. Allison is your standard girl, who works two jobs to take care of herself and have a roof over her head. She enters Tyson’s world and everything gets turned around.
I set out with the intention of making Frozen Over as a standalone, yet due to several requests I’m creating a spin off to go into two other characters stories.  I’m currently in the process of getting my fingers to work magic on the keyboard and make sense on the screen, with the hopes of having it out by the end of the summer.

It’s now in print right? So I have to get my butt moving!

Hey all, I’ve got something awesome for you tonight. The awesome folks at Tor have given me a sneak peek excerpt of Norman Spinrad’s new novel, The People’s Police, to share with y’all. I’ll also be hosting a giveaway for this novel, details will go live tomorrow. Enjoy!

the-peoples-police-cover

Chapter 1
Some folks are still bitching that the Eternal Mardi Gras is a Disney version, what with the traditional Krewes’ parading limited to the traditional lead-up to Fat Tuesday while the big budget corporate floats from Hollywood, Bollywood, and Pornywood parade all year, all long, all over New Orleans, which is sort of true, given that it was Disney I brought in first.

 

But whining that the Mouse has gone and done to the French Quarter what it did to Times Square, and oozed out into the rest of New Orleans like the annual dose of mud during the Hurricane Season, and calling yours truly, Jean-Baptiste Lafitte, a swamp rat traitor to the true soul of the city is going a tad too far, seeing as how the Quarter had fallen far off its fabled glory days even before Katrina.
You expect me to apologize for saving the city from drowning to death?
Oh yes, I did!
Everyone knows New Orleans had been on its economic ass for decades, barely able to pay the cops to keep the Swamp Alligators down in their lowlands swamps and out of the New Orleans Proper high grounds.

 

And the Hurricane Season wasn’t going away, now was it, and what the Dutch were demanding in order to save what was left of the Big Easy from finally going under would’ve been about the total budget of the city government for the next decade or two. No high-priced, high-tech Hans Brinker seawalls and solar windmill pumping stations back then, need I remind you?

 

I guess I do.

 

Amazing what short memories ingrates have.

 

New Orleans featured itself as the Big Easy since before Mickey Mouse was even a gleam in Uncle Walt’s evil eye, but just because the truth wouldn’t look so good in the tourist guides doesn’t mean we don’t all know that it’s always really been the Big Sleazy, now does it?

 

This city was making its living as a haven for pirates and slavers and the riverboat gamblers, saloon keepers and whorehouse impresarios like yours more or less truly, rollers high, low, and medium, who serviced their trade since before the Louisiana Purchase.
The Big Easy was born as the Big Sleazy. Easy?

 

Yeah, sure.

 

Born between a bend in the mighty and mighty ornery Mississip and a briny marsh presumed to call itself Lake Pontchartrain serving as an overflowing catch-basin for tidal surges when the major hurricanes hit and a giant mud puddle in-between.

 

Easy?

 

First built precariously on the natural levees of the Mississippi, expanding greedily and stupidly into the back swamps. Tossed around like a beachball between the French and the Spanish. Finally sold to the Americans by Napoleon on the cheap because he knows he’s gonna lose it to the British anyway if he doesn’t. Flooded every few decades even before Katrina, before there even was an annual Hurricane Season, squeezing what remained onto what high ground was left to it after the sea level rose. The population cut almost in half, forced to live off the tourist and entertainment trade alone when the Gulf oil dried up, just about surrounded by the Alligator Swamp and what crawled up out of it if its back was turned.

 

You call that Easy?

 

Those who adapt survive, like the Cajuns from icy Quebec said when they found themselves in the steamin’ bayous of the Delta, like the Alligator Swamp nutria hunters turning a plague into protein. Those who don’t ain’t been heard from lately. So making legal what the Big Easy always was to pull our terminal condition from the mud is not “selling out the soul of the city” or “whoring ourselves to the mavens of show business.”
Because the Big Easy has always been a whore, a charming, sleazy, free-wheeling, good-natured hooker with a heart of gold and an eye for the main chance, which is what makes her easy, and bein’ easy is the name of the game in this business, which has always been the main game in town. And let an old bordello impresario tell you, who would ever hire a hooker who wasn’t all of the above, and good-lookin’ too?

 

In case you’re forgetting, the Big Easy wasn’t exactly looking as appetizing as a platter of Oysters Bienville back in the day before Mama Legba and Her Supernatural Krewe. She’s all spiffed up and lit up and giving herself the star treatment now, to the point where ingrates and ignoramuses and Creole romantics looking back over their shoulders can afford to complain about how New Orleans is peddling her previously jazzy derrière to less than the genteel bohemian trade of their absinthe fantasies.

 

Whoever wrote that song about there being no business like show business sure got it wrong. As things stand now, there’s no business but show business and we all are in it. Not that we haven’t always been. The only difference now is that it’s making the good times roll again after all those years in the deep dark shit, and that’s good enough for me, and if it’s not good enough for you, this ain’t your town, you’d best leave and go somewhere more to your tight-assholed liking.

 

But y’all come back on vacation from the salt mines, y’hear! Whatever your pleasure, we got it, and if we don’t, don’t worry, no matter how pervo it may seem to your sweaty vestigial morality, we’ll get it for you. Here in the Eternal Mardi Gras of the Big Easy, we make no such judgments, we’re impossible to scandalize, de gustibus non est disputandum.
What pays here, stays here, and never fear, we do still want your money.

 

 

 

Copyright © 2017 by Norman Spinrad

Guest Post Dani Hoots

Alright everyone, I’ve got a guest post for you today from Dani Hoots, author of Trapped in Wonderland. Review for that will be up a little later today. Enjoy!

Thank you Lauren for letting me write a post about what drew me to the theme of Wonderland. I am very grateful to be here and hope that you and your followers enjoy my post.

 

I decided to write a piece based on Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland because of my love for everything “mad”. Wonderland, to me, is a place where the misfits, the outcasts in society, those who are deemed “crazy” can be themselves. I grew up being bullied for being different and loving nerdy things, strange things, and I found myself always escaping to a different world in my mind. To me, Wonderland is a place just like that, so I found myself quoting and loving everything Wonderland.

 

Not only is it somewhere for us “mad” people, it is also a place where we aren’t expect to know where we are going. A lot of people don’t know what the future holds, and as the Cheshire Cat says, “If you don’t know where you are going, any road will get you there”. I think this is a great quote to think about if you find yourself stuck. Just keep moving, keep pushing forward no matter where you are going. Sometimes we start to lose confidence and that is okay. Just keep fighting to fight that is life and you can find your way. 

 

These two themes that are present in Wonderland and are the main reasons I am so drawn to it. I also fell in love with the manga “Alice in the Country of Hearts”, which is based off of a Japanese love sim game (I’m a sucker for love sims, go ahead and judge me). A lot of ideas were inspired by that series and I definitely recommend it if you like manga or anything Wonderland-themed.

 

My favorite characters in Alice’s Adventure’s in Wonderland are the Cheshire Cat and the Mad Hatter, which when you read the novel you will definitely see. The ironic and interesting thing is I found out after marrying my husband and started doing research of his ancestry, that his original name from Germany wasn’t “Hoots” but was in fact “Huth” which means “hat” in German. Their coat of arms is a white background with a black top hat and a big red heart on top of it. I literally married the Mad Hatter and I think that is wonderful.

 

I also think that all of us have a little Alice in us. I love adventure, and love to question everything. We just need to remember to keep our curiosity as we grow older. I think it is hard in today’s society, but it is really important. Curiosity definitely drives me to research and write, so I hope you all keep a little curiosity in whatever you do throughout life. 

 

So I hope you all enjoy my post and my novel Trapped in Wonderland. If you have any questions of comments, feel free to visit me on my Facebook page or my website.

 

The Bad Boy Bargain Tour Banner.png

Hello everyone. I’ve got a guest post or from the author of The Bad Boy Bargain. This is actually part of a blog tour, so if you’re interested, check out the other blogs on the tour. Enjoy!

the-bad-boy-bargain-cover

How a Song Launched an Entire Book

 

I find inspiration for books in a lot of places, but The Bad Boy Bargain was probably the most unusual. Last year, when she heard “Please” by Sawyer Fredericks (from The Voice), my editor, Heather Howland, had an idea for a new YA romance. She posted her thoughts on Twitter—shy guy with a tough shell—and said she wished someone would write it. When I asked when she wanted the manuscript, teasing but also dead serious, we started plotting.

 

“Please” tells the story of a young man who’s found a near-perfect girl, one he thinks he loves, but he’s lying to her at the same time. He’s scared to tell this near-perfect girl the truth about himself because he’s worried she’ll let him go. It’s a song about love and fear, giving and selfishness, longing and despair. All those themes show up in The Bad Boy Bargain, which lends some extra complexity to Kyle beyond the typical bad boy. He’s a guy full of secrets, pain, and shame, but he reallywants someone to see through all of that and love the true Kyle. The working title of the book was called Keeping Faith—because he wants to keep Faith, but needs more faith in himself.

 

As for Faith herself, she’s been mistreated by one guy and has some reservations about being hurt again. The difference between Faith and Kyle is that she’s willing to continue to look for The One even though she’s been burned. She believes in true love, acting with kindness, and being her real self. She suffers from a lack of confidence and self doubt, and Kyle helps her get past that, especially when she struggles with a dance partner who refuses to do his part. Having him in her life restores her faith in love, and in herself.

 

Overall, this story is about two people finding each other and connecting in a way that allows them to be true with each other.

Guest Post Kate Forest

Alright everybody, I’ve got a guest post for you today from Kate forest, the author of Interior Design and Other Emotions and Grounded. With NaNoWriMo going on, what she’s talking about is near and dear to my heart.

Writer’s Block? No, Writer’s Despair.

Generally, when I am finishing up a first draft I panic. Without a clear idea of what to write next, I decide that it’s time to throw in the towel, give up my writing life. I call my critique partner, Veronica Forand, and moan, “I have no more ideas. I don’t think I’ll write again. This is my last book.” Her response is usually to mumble something encouraging or tell me to shut up because I said that last time. (She really is supportive in some ways. There’s a reason I keep her around.)

But no, I insist. This is really it. I’m blank. Nothing is coming to mind. Oh, wait. I’ve got an idea. How about a story in which a woman touches a magical stone and goes back in time to Scotland? No, that’s been done. Ooh, here’s one. How about a modern retelling of Pride and Prejudice, only it will be in diary form. Ok, never mind.

But then this happens. On a rare day, I will get a decent night’s sleep. Not a measly 7 hours interrupted by a trip to the bathroom and the sound of the dog vomiting outside the bedroom door. I mean a gooood night’s sleep. One the ends when the alarm chimes, I stretch, gaze out the window at the sun just peeking above the trees, and smile. No cricks in my middle aged body and plenty of time to get everyone ready for school. And then BLAMO!

A pair of characters appears in my head. They are completely formed and I know exactly why they can never be together, but why they must fall in love and find some way of overcoming their personal and relational obstacles.

Sure, I have no idea what their plot is. Where and when will they live? What will the world and villains throw at them to keep them from their goals? Who the heck knows? That’s a problem to hash out with my critique partners. In that moment, I need to write pages and pages of notes as the ideas pour out.

Of course, by that time, there isn’t plenty of time to get everyone ready for school and the morning seems less serene. But my heart is filled with confidence and hope.  And with those tools, I can do anything. Even write another book.

Guest Post Kathy Clark

So, I’ve got a guest post for you all. Kathy Clark is one half of Bob Kat, the writing team for Not My Life, and she’s got a bit about how they decided to do a time travel series.

NOT MY LIFE, the 5th book in the Time Shifters YA time travel/romance/mystery series will be released on October 18th.  Nothing is as it seems and everyone has a story that needs to be heard.  Our teens travel back to either vindicate or convict their old friend, Dan Denucci.  But the man with a medical degree, a beautiful wife, and a young son is very different from the sad, homeless guy who lives under the pier on Fort Myers Beach, FL.  Who is the real Dan and what did he do to lose everything?

 

Of all the concepts (or tropes), I think time travel would be the most amazing adventure.  You can have the trips to Mars or an excursion down to the Titanic.  Give me a trip to the late 1800s any day to see what the Old West was really like.  Or the early 1800s in Ireland before my family left to come to the U.S.  Or even back to the 1960s just because I love the Beatles.  The hardest part of the trip would be deciding where and when to go first.

 

Where would you go if you could travel back in time?  Who would you want to meet?  What historical event would you like to witness?  What era’s pop culture, fashion and music would you like to experience?

 

That was the idea that sparked our Young Adult series TIME SHIFTERS.  How would it be for four teenagers to be able to go back and see how average people lived, and, along the way, experience the feelings and textures of different times and places?  What kind of challenge would it be for them to do without things they thought they couldn’t live without while having to deal with issues (such as no electricity, different currency, and child labor) that they’ve never thought about?

 

Bob and I have had over forty books published (as Kathy Clark and as Bob Kat), but most were written for adults…about adults.  Writing a YA presented new outlooks on everything from friendship to romance to problem solving.  Obviously, a sixteen-year-old is going to react differently to almost everything than an adult would.

 

And even though dragons and witches and vampires are very popular, we wanted our teens to be real.  No magic spells or mythical creatures save them.  Instead, they have to deal with their issues using only their own ingenuity, creativity, and the friendship they share.  Plus, we wanted our young readers to “accidentally” learn a little about history and what was normal back then as compared to now.

 

My favorite books when I was growing up were Trixie Beldon and Nancy Drew mysteries, as well as Agatha Christie and Mary Stewart.  We wanted our teenagers to be 21st Century versions of the very interesting and intelligent characters from those famous novels.

 

Having never written a book with lead characters under the age of twenty-one, we were a little nervous about capturing the innocence, insecurities, and youthful logic of teenagers.  But the four characters we created became so real to us that we easily slipped into their heads and their hearts.  Their vulnerabilities and dreams are so pure and yet heart-breaking as they discover the cruelties of the real world.

 

Basically, this series allows Bob and me to do a little time travelling, too, as we go back to the memories of our own teenage years and hang out with our four new friends, Kelly, Austin, Scott, and Zoey as they learn how to love and live and survive in a world that’s not always kind.

 

Come along.  Whether you’re twelve or ninety-two, you’ll enjoy the trip.

 

Visit us at our website www.LoveRealityRomance.com or write us at Kathy@Nightwriter93.com.  We would love to hear where and when you think our teenagers should travel to in the next book.  Reviews are always appreciated.

 

 

Bob Kat loves to hear from their fans.  Write us at TheThrillOfSuspense@gmail.com and tell us where you’d like to have Kelly, Scott, Austin and Zoey travel to next.