Category: Eldrich Abomination


Not posted on a Wednesday, but hey, I didn’t skip this week. Quick reminder that the giveaway for The People’s Police Giveaway is still going until midnight Sunday the 19th. This book’s one that I bought rather than being send to review. So, enjoy!

your-favorite-band-cannot-save-you-cover

Beautiful Remorse is your new favorite band. You couldn’t say why if asked. You couldn’t even really say anything about the lyrics. But their music does something for you. To you. It’s like nothing you’ve ever heard, and their singer, Airee MacPherson. She’s fantastic, completely out of this world.  Strange things keep happening with each new track they release. Beautiful Remorse is your new favorite band, and your favorite band cannot save you.

Scotto Moore’s Your Favorite Band Cannot Save You: a tale in ten tracks is a quick fun read that’ll pull you along right to the end. The first two thirds of the book is solid genre fiction, but then it gets to a certain point and everything starts to feel kind of rushed. Think of it a little bit like a love letter to the Cthulhu mythos through the lens of modern internet culture.

There are a few bits that needed more attention throughout the book. Without that, the end isn’t a total big lipped alligator moment, but it does still feel under supported. I’d have liked more exposition on Aimee’s plan or the music itself, though the narrator’s limited knowledge goes a ways towards explaining that away.

My other big issue is with the characters. I legitimately cannot remember the narrator’s name or much of anything about him. The same goes for most of the characters that aren’t Airee, they sort of get lost in her or the music and just don’t come up again. I could easily say that this was a purposeful thing and that a big part of the point was a collective nothingness for humanity. It still doesn’t really work for me in the long run though, at the end of the day I’m still very much invested in character over plot.

More than anything, Your Favorite Band Cannot Save You reminds me of a B movie. Despite its faults, the story is aggressively readable and fast paced. It’s eyes off the action to build tension, which works well in a lot of ways. This is a book that could have been a lot better with a little work, but it doesn’t need it to be a fun book. If that makes sense at all. It’s fun, it’s fast, and at the end of the day I still really enjoyed it.

So, where does that leave us? While Your Favorite Band Cannot Save You has some issues, I still had a ton of fun with it. So, from me at least, it gets a four out of five.

I’ve mentioned being on another Slendy kick multiple times recently, so I thought I would mention that I ordered a copy of House of Leaves due to it being referenced a fair deal in the mythos.  It arrived yesterday, wrapped appropriately creepily in plain brown paper and listed only as being from “Family”.  Even if this wasn’t on purpose, I approve wholeheartedly.  I haven’t gotten far in yet and the beginning is a little on the slow side, but I am enjoying it so far.

In other news, I kind of completely wigged on that review and will be posting it as soon as it’s written.

Like it says in the title, I’m really not sure what I’m talking about today so this will probably go a little where did all of this come from I swear there wasn’t a giraffe in my bag when I packed it!

After writing the post asking if anyone thought that Slendy could be successfully brought into the relm of books I began trolling the piss out of a friend of mine because she’s easy to freak out.  So I decided to try writing the project I mentioned.  I’ve been noticing weird things lately, the trees are watching me. OK, no this isn’t turning into a slenderblog, I just felt like writing that.  It got me thinking though, what makes for good horror?  Here’s the top five things that I’ve come up with.

5) Group Fear – One of my favorite things to do with the slenderblogs is to read/watch them with my friends and see there reactions.  It’s great to watch one of them freak out when something big happens like the Thin Duke going after the main character(s).  An audience feeds off of its own fear even across the internet and the fear builds and readers get this great kind of freaked out that later readers miss out on to some degree.  Horror movies in theaters are great because of the other audience members also reacting.

4) Monsters in Odd Places/ Times – The Faceless Fellow can and has shown up at any time of day in just about any area.  Sure water is supposed to drive him off and supposedly he can’t see anyone above about the second story as human, but he did peek in that window in Marble Hornets and he is always surrounded by fog.  Monsters are expected to show up in the dead of night, possibly while it’s raining cats and dogs, so putting them out in full day light especially if they’re not being used for a cat scare works great.

3) Backstory – Mr. Happy has tons of backstory, mostly built by the internet hivemind and then polished by the slenderblogers.  It’s been built upon by hundreds of people since that first picture appeared on Something Awful and there’s enough variation to make it feel very much like one of the urban legends that have been around forever, like Bloody Mary or the thing that lives under the hill.  It’s creepy and leaves a reader wondering what is being left out and what could be worse.

2) Ambiguity – We don’t even know what Slender Man is exactly, but like the Blair Witch before him we get freaked out by him.  What is he?  What does he want?  Why is he here?  Are we making him stronger by writing about him?  If so, why do we keep writing about him?  With the Blair Witch, the audience never sees her only what she does to the film makers.  Or before that even, Psycho has Norman Bates’ mother who dotes on him so much that she murders the woman who stays in the motel, but she’s been dead the whole time.  People fear the unknown, so it only makes sense that the unknown would make for good horror.

1) Character Reactions – One of the biggest things that makes The Tall Guy terrifying in Marble Hornets is the way everyone reacts to him.  He’s just standing there slendering around, but Jay is flipping his shit over it because holy cow it’s going to take me away and eat my soul/eyes/memories.  Masky gets to attack people just about every time he’s shown, but the Gentleman in the Suit seldom attacks directly.  Which one has people training cameras on themselves and running for their lives?

That’s what I’ve been able to think up.  What do you guys think?  What makes you jump when things go bump in the night?

A friend of mine and I had a conversation earlier today regarding the Slender Man and horror movies.  It’s one of those things that makes a really good story when handled well, such as with Marble Hornets or Just Another Fool.  What I’m wondering is if it  could be applied to literature effectively.  We’re talking a Lovecraftian monstrosity that stalks and kills anyone who pays to much attention to him (it?) here, a monstrosity that already has a ton of back story and exposure from all the ARGs and Slenderbloggers.  Would it apply well to literature?  To books that don’t up date with something new every few days or weeks?  The amount of hits that places like Dreams in Darkness and, again, Just Another Fool get even after being finished could suggest so.  Would the Slenderbloggers and the guys who run the ARGs react well to a novelist adding to their mythology?  Would they tie it into what they were doing as a kind of “those poor fools what have they done”  or would they decry someone trying to capitalize on the ground work that they laid?  At the end of the day, would there be enough interest outside of the internet to make it worthwhile to a publisher to print a novel that played with Slendy or would it be ignored by all but the already present followers online?

What do you guys think?  Is Slendy something that could work in a book or should he stay online?   Heck, maybe sound off with your favorite Slenderblog or ARG while you’re at it.

Happy Memorial Day weekend everybody!

 

The teens in Gethsemane, Ohio have begun killing themselves terrifyingly regularly.  No one knows why.  Steven Wrigley just wants to finish high school until the names appear.  They’re in his hand writing, in his notebook.  Clouds and suicides.  Something is wrong in Gethsemane.  Something is feeding off of the sorrow from the suicides.

Anderson Prunty’s writing in The Sorrow King makes me think of beat poetry.  There’s a feel to it like the characters don’t quite know what to do with themselves and are trying to talk themselves through the situation.  Normally this would bother me but it works here because The Sorrow King is very much about the characters.  Steven spends much of his time as a focus character trying to figure out what, if anything, has anything to do with him directly.  He’s interested in finding out more about the girl than figuring out what’s going on with the town.  The character interactions more than make up for the Sorrow King himself not showing up until the last third or so of the book.  He just isn’t as important as the characters’ reactions to what he’s done.  The Sorrow King represents a barrier rather than a character of his own, a mental block that’s become something more.

There were some points where Steven’s whining became a bother, but those were few and far between.  Some of Connor’s parts were hard to read due to his constant worrying.  All said though I would read more of Prunty’s work if it’s all this kind of quality.  I give The Sorrow King a four out of five.