Squeaking in at the last moment, I have one last Halloween treat for you all. Yes readers, today you get two reviews! Enjoy!

edgar-allan-poe-an-adult-coloring-book-cover

Edgar Allan Poe: And Adult Coloring Book by Odessa Begay is a bit of an outlier for my reviews, so bear with me here.

Back in high school and middle school I read a fair amount of Edgar Allan Poe’s short fiction and some of his poetry. The dark broodiness appealed in a lot of ways and I loved the detail work in some of his stories and the slow decent into madness that overtook most of his protagonists. So, when given the chance to review a coloring book based on his work, I accepted happily.

My experience with adult coloring books involves a lot of little fiddly bits that take a ton of attention to detail to fill out well. I like that because it makes me slow down and focus on what I’m doing. This particular adult coloring book has some of that, but not nearly enough for my taste. Most of the art is presented in two page spreads with one page having a section of writing from the piece that it’s referencing. This works both to the book’s advantage and disadvantage.

On some pieces the spread allows for a grand scope and a good deal of detail work. On others it winds up with a lot of empty space that leaves the art feeling incomplete or like it’s floating. The amount empty space is definitely my biggest issue with the book itself, there is quite a lot of it. That said, the paper feels nice and heavy and the quality feels good. I didn’t get the chance to test it with markers, but it takes color pencils very well.

I feel like the sections of prose could have been worked in better in many of the spreads. In many cases the prose is just kind of left hanging in empty space, making it feel less like a centerpiece than I think it is supposed to be. The spreads where it’s boxed in or solidly framed work best for me personally.

Where does that leave the review then? I’m giving it a three out of five, mostly because of the empty space and partly because some of the art has a tendency to feel detached from itself.

Advertisements