Is this really what it looks like? I’ve posted a review after all this time and it’s not even a holiday. Speaking of, I know what I’m gonna do for Halloween. More on that in a bit, for now, enjoy!

The Earth is wrecked.  Staying outside without a respirator is certain death and most of humanity lives in domed cities while scientists on the moon colony search for an acceptable new home world. Unfortunately something keeps killing them.

The Killing Jar by R. S. McCoy is an interesting piece of apocalyptic sci-fi in part because most of its individual parts should be bog standard by now, but they are combined into something quite entertaining. That’s largely because of the characters but also because each subplot has a sense of weight to it, like it’s going somewhere big.

This is one of those books that was really hard for me to review, largely because most of the issues I have with it are things that could have been dropped without a ton of change to the book proper. A big example of this was the, essentially, caste system that this society runs on. It wasn’t much of a bother to me until later in the book as I was thinking back on things. There was also some relationship stuff that really irked me, I’ll get to that later though.

So, there’re three tiers of society, plus a garbage level for people who don’t fit their caste or run off for whatever reason. Scientists get a bunch of genetic modifications to be tall and smart, they get the best pay, and they’re generally the most respected, but they don’t get to fall in love and they don’t get art or music. Craftsmen don’t get the genetic modifications, don’t seem to get paid much, and do most of the work building and maintaining everything, but they seem to get more personal choices than scientists. Then there’s artists, they don’t really seem to have a place in this world. Artists legitimately seem to exist in the plot for the male lead to get angsty over having to give up music and so his best friend can abandon him and science for his boyfriend. That’s probably a writing oversight thing, the book doesn’t really go into any caste except the scientists.  But if the author was going to use this particular convention, complete with mandatory selection day when you come of age, I really wish she’d done more with it.

My second big thing, as mentioned, was some of the relationship stuff.  Most of the relationships are painfully surface level and, much like the social striation could have been cut pretty easily. There’s a couple of exceptions that I feel like were done pretty well, but they were the exception rather than the rule. It’s not like the ones that weren’t done well were a huge part of their respective plots, it’s just that I feel like they either could have been done a lot better or came out of left field.

Now, all that said, I really enjoyed the book for the most part. It had a few more side plots than I would have liked, but they felt like they were going places instead of just being there as filler. The characters didn’t communicate well, but half of them are teenaged and the other half have hidden agendas. I definitely appreciated how much each character was gone into, especially given the number of side plots going on. The ending leaves me, instead of disappointed, curious to see where everything goes from here and how it all ties together.

So, all that said, R.S. McCoy’s The Killing Jar gets a four out of five.

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