Hello all, long time no review.  Classes have been doing their level best to eat my life, but who doesn’t feel that way.  Fall Break is coming up and I could use a nap.  Something, something, comic books on Wednesday, something, tired joke, something, Necronomicon, also that the Deadworld giveaway ends at midnight tonight.  Winners should be announced sometime tomorrow, Thursday at the latest.

Angela Sage Larsen’s Fifties Chix: Travel to Tomorrow appealed to me for two reasons when I first heard of it: history and time travel.  I wasn’t really sure if it would pull either off well given the amount of research needed for one and issues that tend to pop up in the other, but I was beyond pleasantly surprised.  The characters don’t magically know modern slang and continue talking like something from I Love Lucy throughout the book.  They aren’t just dumped into the future to fend for themselves.  Their families and classmates are still there, just different.  The book shows the characters trying to deal with life fifty-five years in the future and figure out how they got there in the first place.  It shows problems that they have and frames of reference that they’re missing.  Maxine gets an excellent moment with her family, specifically her cousin, because she was raised during the civil rights movement.  Stuff like that serves to illustrate the social differences of the times without dropping too many anvils.  Ann and Mary each get thrown for a loop at their families’ lack of religion in the future.

My only big issue with Travel to Tomorrow is that it’s obviously the first in a series and ends with a massive hook for the rest of the books.  I get that the hook is supposed to keep me interested in the series until the next one comes out but it also takes me out of the story with one big jolt; kind of like if half way through the book Maxine had started using modern slang or Bev just stopped being into sports for no reason.  My only other problem was with some of the handwriting used for the journal sections, and that was only because I’m terrible at reading cursive.

I enjoyed Travel to Tomorrow immensely.  It was definitely written to a younger audience but managed to mostly avert writing down to them.  It made my inner history nerd practically dance.  That said, it loses points for the obvious hook.  I dislike it when something big is confirmed and then I have to wait for the next book.  So, what’s the verdict?  I’m giving Travel to Tomorrow a four out of five.  I’m also making note of some of the phrases in the last chapter/glossary to use in messing with my friends.

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