This is so late I cannot even.  Getting ready for the up-coming term has been kicking my butt so hard I’m amazed that I can still sit down.  The good news is that I’ve got a couple of books ready to review soon and I’ll be getting to do another giveaway later this month along with a guest post by the book’s author, the bad news is that I’ll still have to take the time to pack and unpack everything and get back into classes mode.  Things should be back to something like normal within the next few weeks.

On a peaceful night in western Nebraska a group of teenagers looking to film themselves getting high are attacked by a mysterious creature.  The attack leaves them apparently electrocuted with only mysterious scorch marks as evidence.  Maggie O’Dell has to make sense of differing accounts of the evening and her witnesses being killed off one by one.  Meanwhile in Washington, D.C. Benjamin Platt is called in on an outbreak of an unknown contagion at an elementary school.  What connection is there between the two cases?

Alex Kava does a really excellent job of balancing analytical science based story telling with jabs of high octane action and high emotion.  Hotwire, while a little slow at the start, builds on itself with connections between O’Dell and Platt’s cases resulting in a read that barrels towards its conclusion at a break neck pace.  We also get character development for Racine whose first name is Julia apparently, I’d forgotten that.  One of the really interesting things in Hotwire is seeing the differences in how characters view each other, this is shown especially well in Platt and Racine’s interactions throughout the book.

I’ve only got one problem with Hotwire and unfortunately it’s a big one.  The story telling is excellent, as good as anything Kava’s done before, but the plot leaves way too many dangling threads.  Characters who turn out to be really important to the plot don’t get the characterization to carry their importance and bits of dead end plot happened that could have easily been cut out without hurting the story in the least.  It didn’t hurt the story while I was reading it, but it did lead to a ton of fridge logic and a feeling that this was a bit less streamlined than some of Kava’s earlier books.

I’m giving Hotwire a solid four out of five.  This one’s worth re-reading later.

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