I have a bad habit of not being able to find the next book in a series that I like.  I’ll read the first couple and then nothing, which was the case with Elizabeth Vaughan’s Chronicles of the Warlands a few years back.  I never could find the third book in the trilogy.  Not that that stopped me from jumping at the chance to read the fourth book to review. On to the review then.

Atira of the Bear values her freedom above all else.  Heath of Xy would do anything to protect his queen.  Both hunger for each other and maybe something more.  But trouble is brewing in the court of Xy and it will take all they have to uncover the players involved and find what is truly dear to them.

Keir and Xylara are headed back to Waters Fall for the birth of their child, but this isn’t their story.  Front and center in Warcry are Heath, Lara’s childhood friend, and Atira, the plains woman whose leg Lara healed way back in Warprize.  Both Heath and Atira were fairly minor characters for the first two books but the promotion to lead character doesn’t feel forced. Both are dedicated to protecting their leaders and each other.  Both are stubborn and strong and they play off of each other really well.  Atira’s temper meshes well with Heath’s level headedness and it was just hilarious to read his reactions to her teasing.  It was interesting to see Atira’s reactions to the city and its people as well as her responses to Xyan culture.  It was also kind of nice to see that she and Heath were, for the most part, on even footing when it came to fight scenes and verbal sparring.

I will admit that I was a bit disappointed with the villains.  I understand that Lord Durst wants to avenge his sons and that he doesn’t want the royal family to mix with the conquers who killed them, but he also gets into using some fairly misogynistic language towards Lara and doesn’t seem to get why anyone would take offense to it.  This guy’s supposed to be a powerful lord and the leader of a conspiracy?  There’s also Lanfer, who was apparently Heath’s rival from childhood.  He has no real reason to join the conspiracy; he’s just doing it to make Heath suffer.  But why, I never got what Heath did to make Lanfer want him dead.  There were a few instances of heroes holding the idiot ball, but those were forgivable due to circumstances within the novel.

I had a small number of problems following bits of some conversations due to not having read the third book, but it was more like having missed a few episodes of a soap opera than anything big.  Warcry gets a four out of five for solid writing, likeable characters, and continuing the plot of the last three books in the series without getting stale.


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